Kingston Stockade Look to Implement Promotion and Relegation

The Kingston Stockade, a lower league soccer team based in Kingston, have been making waves in the world of soccer after writing a letter to the United States Soccer Federation regarding the implementation of promotion and relegation into the US Soccer pyramid. If the request is denied by US Soccer, owner and chairman Dennis Crowley says that he will file a lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation.

The United States of America’s soccer league system is one of the few in the world that do not use the system of promotion and relegation. The concept is simple. The worst three teams in the top division are dropped down a step on the league pyramid, and the best three teams from the league underneath on the pyramid. Take England for example. In the English Premier League last season, the three worst teams were Sunderland, Hull, and Middlesbrough. These three teams were sent down to the second division (Football League Championship) and replaced by the three best teams from the second division last year, in this case being Huddersfield, Brighton, and Newcastle. Every year, the Premier League has three new teams replacing the ones relegated the year before, while all other lower leagues have six new ones, as three teams are promoted to the league above and three are relegated to the league below in every other league.

Setting up promotion and relegation allows players to showcase their talents at a higher level. In the current setup in the United States, players can be stuck in the lower divisions for their entire careers, never getting the chance to play at a more elite level, and some truly talented players have fallen through the cracks. Others believe that promotion and relegation would allow more teams to get more money to pump into youth soccer academies, which would raise the future talent level in the USA. This would likely raise the credibility of U.S. soccer in the eyes of the rest of the world, which view the American National Team as underachievers after failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

Promotion and relegation also allows teams to participate at a higher level, giving them a better chance to make money. In every country, including the US, the top league gets the lion’s share of the revenue from ticket sales, media rights, and publicity. What Crowley argues is that the teams in Major League Soccer are using the league and its exclusivity as a form of monopoly over the market of soccer in the United States. He argues that promotion and relegation create more of a meritocracy, which is one of the fundamental aspects of capitalism. Most teams in the United States’ second division, the North American Soccer League, most likely wouldn’t beat the big guns in the MLS, but they might be. For instance, Leicester City was promoted to the English Premier League in 2014 after winning the second division. After a middle of the road 2014-15 season that saw them narrowly escape relegation, they would go on to win the league title at 5,000 to 1 odds in 2015-16. They were also able to build elite level youth training programs with the revenue that they brought in from the Premier League.

However, promotion and relegation in the United States doesn’t come without problems, and it has been met by critics both on and off the field. “I think promotion and relegation is a strong solution to bringing more attention to the game in this county, but I don’t think it’s the best solution to developing into a bigger soccer nation” said Ernest Mitchell, a defender on the Kingston Stockade last season.

One of the major problems of promoting smaller teams into bigger leagues is the problem with finances. While rich owners like Crowley can afford to move his team up to a higher league, many other teams cannot. “There are not enough teams, and there’s not enough money in US Soccer,” said Enzo Petrocelli, a midfielder who has spent time playing soccer in both the United States and Italy. Lower leagues on the soccer pyramid are broken up into regional conference so that the travel costs for the teams is kept to as low as possible. If a team from a regionalized league, like the Stockade, gets promoted to the NASL, which is a nationwide league, the team’s travel costs would increase exponentially. Rather than Kingston traveling by bus to close locations like Brooklyn or Portsmouth, N.H., they would instead be traveling cross-country to Phoenix and Las Vegas, which would require airfare. Not many teams would be able to afford that, especially in the first season in the new league.

Whether or not promotion and relegation should be implemented in the United States soccer leagues is one of the most hot-button issues in soccer. Supporters of promotion and relegation will often cite the Leicester City story, while detractors echo the sentiments of Petrocelli and Mitchell. Either way, a good majority of diehard fans of US soccer have a strong opinion on the matter.

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The importance of dieting to Marist athletes

Marist College has over 20 varsity sports teams on campus along with several club teams as well. With the variety of sports that Marist has to offer, there seems to be a difference in how each team handles their diet to stay in shape for their specific sport. Players from several Marist sports gave their insight and experience with dieting on their respective Marist team and how they may differ from those of other teams.

Members from Marist baseball team, club hockey team, and women’s swimming and diving team have strong opinions about how athletes should handle their dieting methods if they want to be healthy and in shape for their team. Continue reading

Mid-Hudson Civic Center Heating Up

The Marist College club hockey team usually plays their home games at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center in Poughkeepsie. However, last month, there has been an issue which has prevented the hockey team from being able to have their home games there this weekend. “Our ice cooler broke down last month and we haven’t been able to fix it within the last couple of weeks so there is no ice,” Sal Manteria, rink manager of the Civic Center, said. Without proper ice conditions, the Red Foxes have had to make changes to their schedule. The team will play their two weekend home games in Newburgh rather than in their usually location Poughkeepsie.
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Hitting through the heat

Despite the summer season coming to an end next week, it doesn’t seem like Mother Nature seems to care that in Poughkeepsie, NY, September 21 is the beginning oft he fall season. Changing leaf colors, cooler temperatures, pumpkin picking and all the other wonderful Hudson Valley perks occur during this time of the year. At Marist College, September is not usually as hot as the other summer month of the year, but students and staff and community members continue to prepare their days for nearly 90-degree weather and severe humidity.

For the tennis team at Marist College this means staying hydrated, keeping the rally of the tennis ball going and somewhat faking it until they make it to the end of practice. Or at least that’s what the coaches think they are doing to battle the unexpected heat during the third week of college. On such a hot day (nearly 15-degrees above average temperatures) for this time of year, the coaching staff had some tips to playing smart in such conditions. “Preparing before the day, hydrating in the morning before practice is necessary for a successful day,” said head coach Tim Smith. By the time players reach practice they need to have already been drinking water to battle the heat and sun. While the head coach worries about hydration the assistant coach Ron Lane discussed “making sure players take breaks ever 20-30 minutes after intense work outs.”Quick breaks throughout the practices can ensure that no one gets exhausted and keep seach session efficient enough to complete without any serious injuries.

Rain holds off for men’s league championship

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D’backs pitcher Nick Ugarte looks in for the sign against the Cubs’ Mike Gajdos.

The Hudson Valley National Adult Baseball Association narrowly avoided a major scheduling conundrum.

Rain threatened the playability of the championship game for their Rec Division, as early morning storms rolled through Dutchess County this past Sunday.

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New Women’s Basketball Rules Affect how Band, Dance, Cheer Units Operate

Last Thursday was the home opener for the Marist College Women’s Basketball regular season, but for those who attended that game, it could have just as equally been a completely different event that they were attending. It wasn’t because the team played unusually bad, or that the ambience was completely different with the band away to practice for an upcoming concert. No, it was something else that seemed off. Even if the fans could not put their finger on it, they would come to figure this curious sense of change in due time. Continue reading

Marist swimmer Bethany Powhida excels both in and out of the pool

Bethany currently serves as the junior co-captain of the Marist swim team and holds the 100-yard backstroke school record. Photo Courtesy of Bethany Powhida

Bethany currently serves as the junior co-captain of the Marist swim team and holds the 100-yard backstroke school record.
Photo Courtesy of Bethany Powhida

As a Marist record-holder and co-captain in only her junior year, swimmer Bethany Powhida’s competitive drive and commitment has excelled her further with each stroke.

“Her attitude, willingness to change and tremendous work ethic” is what Head Coach Larry VanWagner says makes her “the exception, not the norm in swimming.”

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Mens Basketball 2014: What To Watch For

The Marist men’s basketball team has not finished the season with a winning record since the 2007-2008 season when they went 18-14. Despite losing their first game of the season the Red Foxes showed that they are a competitive team ready to take Marist back into the hunt and continue the success of new Head Coach Mike Maker. Coach Maker is known for his winning and with him taking over the team here is a list of things to look for during the 2014-2015 season.

• Khallid Hart
Although Marist lost their first game to Bucknell 75-72, red-shirt sophomore Hart had a great game scoring a career-high 33 points. Last year he averaged 14.7 points a game under Coach Jeff Bower. Hart is really taking control of the team after winning the MAAC Rookie of the Year last season. He is a very exciting player offensively and plans on focusing more on defense this year to become a threat on both sides of the ball. As the season progresses people should watch what Hart does on the court to help lead the Red Foxes to a winning season.

• Coach Maker

Coach Maker (left) after signing to be Head Coach of the Marist Men's Basketball Team

Coach Maker (left) after signing to be Head Coach of the Marist Men’s Basketball Team

Head Coach Mike Maker is in his first season with Marist after spending six years at Williams College. While there he had a record of 147-32 and made it on College Insiders list of the top 25 non Division-1 head coaches. “He’s a really gifted coach. He’s a teacher, and players will develop and get better. He’s someone that I think is very professional, and people at the school will enjoy working with him” said Oregon Head Coach Dana Altman who was assisted by Coach Maker during his time at Creighton. Maker is excited to be at the Divison-1 level and the players are excited to have him. “There’s been receptiveness to the new coaching style. “The whole coaching staff has been great, being demanding with us and bonding with us and creating trust from us” said senior Chavaughn Lewis who is the 7th all-time scorer in Marist history.

• Chavaughn Lewis
Lewis is the 7th all-time scores in Marist history and is 537 points away from being first. Lewis is a senior and Maker is happy to have him on his team. “When you look at our senior class, certainly Chavaughn Lewis is an All-MAAC player. I’ve been totally impressed with his ability, his toughness, his competitiveness. He’s lightning in a bottle” said Maker. “We feel so blessed to have him. I wish I had him for more than one year” he added. Being a senior Lewis is ready to win “I’m just ready to get out after it with those guys” he said, with those guys referencing his teammates. While 537 points is no easy feat, with another great season it is possible for Chavaughn Lewis to become Marist’s all-time leading point scorer after having 544 points last season.

Marist’s home opener is this Saturday, November 22nd, against Army at 7 p.m. The first 1,000 students to attend will receive a free Marist T-Shirt. Make sure to watch Hart and Lewis as they are looking to be a top five team under Coach Maker in what is sure to be an exciting season.