Marist’s football team struggles to deal with scorching heat

Some of the team poses between afternoon practice, where temperatures reached the high 90s.

Some of the team poses with Coach Poveromo between afternoon practice, with temperatures reaching the high 90s.

With sizzling hot temperatures rolling into the early days of September, the Marist College Football team continues to be challenged by the scorching heat and high humidity. The team confesses that this late August’s preseason was their hardest yet, from the intensity of their practices, to the unbearable, sleepless nights in Champagnat Hall. But due to climate change, there has been a culture change taking over college football, this especially hot season. The sport’s tradition of having multiple practices a day for conditioning purposes, is becoming a questionable practice.

According to the NCAA, recent years have marked an increase in player injury and death due to heat-related causes, and as a result, “two-a-day” practices are becoming an antiquated ideal for collegiate football teams. To address heat concerns, in 2003 the NCAA  prohibited two-a-days on consecutive days and during the first five days of practice. But despite this fact, this year members of Marist’s team experienced first-hand some of the dangerous effects of multiple practices a day in the grueling heat.
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Becoming a certified athletic trainer through Marist College

The Marist College athletic training program is one of the most time consuming and laborious majors a student can elect to study. The long-term goal for an athletic training student is to become a certified athletic trainer. However, receiving your bachelor’s degree in athletic training from Marist does not make you a certified athletic trainer. There are many steps, from being accepted into the program to working clinical rotations, that students in the field must go through before becoming certified.

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Being Told You Can’t, Doesn’t Mean You Stop Trying

“Early is on time, on time is late, and late is unacceptable!” This was the motto that Dan Ventricelli followed when he was young, and is the same motto, that he continues to follow today.

Daniel Ventricelli Jr., now in his third year at Marist College, attempted to walk on to the Marist College Baseball team his freshman year. Unfortunately for him, things didn’t go the way he wanted. When cuts were announced, Ventricelli found out that he would not be a part of the team. “It hurt inside,” said Ventricelli. “Being told you can’t play something that you enjoy, hurts, but that was the fuel I used to work harder.” And work harder was exactly what he did.

Having played baseball since he was a little kid, Ventricelli didn’t want to stop playing the game he loved. He knew that in order to try and make the team the following year, it would take a lot of effort and determination. Getting better and improving was something that Dan was committed to doing. “I literally went to the gym every day and played on a competitive summer ball team,” he said. “I ate healthy and was focused on the small things that I needed to improve on.” Continue reading