Silberstein Inspires at the 29th Annual Holocaust Remembrance

Michael Silberstein

Michael Silberstein

Moments of silence and disbelief were experienced in the Nelly Golletti Theater on April 19 as the Marist College community remembered those lost in the Holocaust during the 29th Annual Holocaust Remembrance.

The ceremony featured performances by the Marist College Chamber Singers, a welcome speech from President David Yellen, and a lighting of memorial candles. The event remembered those lost during the tragedy, as well as honored those still living. “People think of the Holocaust as this historical event and something that was so long ago and far away when realistically there are survivors,” says Justin Katz, President of Marist College Hillel.

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Marist College Chamber Choir

Among the survivors was Michael Silberstein, a Holocaust survivor and the featured speaker. Hundreds of students, faculty, and local residents gathered to listen to Silberstein’s inspiring story of agony and survival. During the sixty minute recount of his life, Silberstein described the horrors of enduring a Jewish ghetto and two concentration camps, including Auschwitz. Like so many others, his experience was excruciating, but his triumph is inspiring.

At eighty-nine years old, Silberstein is a true survivor. But the horror he faced during the years of 1939 to 1945 will be forever branded in his memory, just as the scars are on his skin. He recalls arriving at Auschwitz and being tattooed so the Nazi soldiers could identify the prisoners. “From then on I was just a number. But I was lucky because I was alive,” said Silberstein.

After three years in a concentration camp, World War II ended. When the Americans liberated Germany, he was fourteen years-old, completely alone, and two of his five siblings along with his mother had been killed by the Nazis. “I had nothing to lose anymore,” recalls Silberstein of his eventual move to the United States. Yet Silberstein still reiterates that he was one of the lucky ones to be able to escape.

Lucky is a relative term, but alive is exactly what Silberstein and hundreds of thousands of other survivors are. Yet the hundreds of thousands left are a minimal sample compared to the tens of millions lost in the most horrifying attack on human existence in modern history. Stories like these live on through survivors, but survivors are in their 80’s, 90’s and 100’s. Time with them is precious; to hear their stories, and make sure what happened to them never happens to humanity again. “It’s so incredible to hear the stories of survivors firsthand, because they won’t be around forever. In order to prevent tragedies we must remember and honor them,” said ceremony attendee and Marist College Junior Elizabeth Sullivan. On this particular night, the Holocaust Remembrance Committee felt the most chilling reminder was the most necessary: that the Holocaust was not that long ago. “The event was directed towards anti-semitism, but it encompassed a broader aspect of hate in general,” says Katz. 

The scars revealed by Michael Silberstein are a reminder to the Marist College community that the human race must collectively never let something like this happen again. And according to Katz that is what the committee was conveying to the community, “I think it’s really important to remind people that something on that scale happened only seventy years ago…And that’s what the committee was trying to portray with the event; to stop hate.”

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SNR Showcases Senior Fashion Students one Catwalk at a Time  

Marist Fashion students are buckling down in preparation for the 33rd Annual Silver Needle Runway Show (SNR) on May 10th, 2019. Students create what is once an empty space into an environment that feels like a show right out of New York Fashion Week.

“I’ve heard the show is going to be huge and really outdo itself from previous years. I absolutely love the Fashion Program here, it’s one of the top in the country. Although I’m not a Fashion Design Major, it is incredible to see the talent that is behind each sewing machine and how each student really creates walking forms of art,” said sophomore Jenna Rinaldi.

The SNR show originated in 1984 and since then has increased their professionalism and talent to new heights. Each show holds over 1,000 guests, including professionals in the field to critique seniors on their work. The event showcases the work done by senior design students during their semester long Senior Thesis Project.

While many show-goers are in awe of the numerous pieces students have designed, many forget about the individuals behind the scenes that enable the show to take place. Those in the Fashion Show Production Class showcase their artistry and display their ability to host such a major event to over thousands of individuals each year.

“This is my second year as a member of the Creative Team for the Production Class. The class is an extremely fulfilling experience but that definitely comes with hard work,” said sophomore Amanda Lauro. “It can sometimes feel more like an internship, making it great for a resume builder and talking point in interviews. You truly get as much out of the class as you put in and are given as much responsibility as you prove yourself capable of.”

While the work of design students is showcased through the fashion show, the class controlling all aspects of the show is the Fashion Show Production Class. In order to be apart of the class, students are required to go through a rigorous interview process as well as sharing a portfolio of their work. While being in the class sounds like a lot of work, many students express that the experience truly prepares them for the real world.  

“While there are so many fun and exciting times throughout the process of planning the show, if someone were to ask me if they should apply to the class I would first and foremost stress the time component,” said junior Dylan Skinner.

Besides finding a place to host the show and dealing with ticket orders, the Fashion Show Production Class advertises the show by creating promotional videos and showcasing photos to draw students in to attending this highly anticipated event for the fashion community at Marist. From simple coffee sleeves Starbucks has been giving out, to Instagram stories SNR volunteers have been posting, all the little details add up to what students hope to be a packed audience on May 10th.

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The class also holds a number of fundraisers to decrease the cost of the show, as this year they have gone over budget. “The biggest challenge of the class is working within a tight budget, we want to make the show as amazing as possible while also keeping finances in mind. But, with this you have to become an expert problem solver and use your creativity wherever you possibly can.” said Lauro. Some fundraisers they have done include a Candy Bar and pairing with local frozen yogurt store, Sweet Frog, to raise some extra cash on the side.  

Overall, fashion students and those in the production class are looking forward to this event that truly showcases the talent and hard work the Fashion Department puts into the program each year.

“When coming to the Silver Needle Runway Show, expect a high-production event that first and foremost works towards giving the amazing senior designer garments a great way to showcase their hard work. And with each tiny detail you notice at the venue, there was a Fashion Show Production team member slaving away, pulling all-nighters, and doing whatever they needed to do to make this night perfect,” said Skinner.

The event will take place on May 10th, 2019 in the Mid-Hudson Civic Center at 4:00 pm and 7:00 pm and tickets are available on ticketmaster.com.  

“If you want to experience what it’s like to watch a fashion show as professional as one you may see on the New York Fashion Week, this show is a must see,” said sophomore Skyler Caruso.

 

OZZI Machine Solves Wastefulness at North End Dining

 

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The OZZI machine.

 

The OZZI Machine will allow the switch from disposables to reusables starting next semester at North End Dining at Marist College.

“OZZI is a revolutionary system that eliminates traditional disposable take-out containers for all segments of the foodservice industry by utilizing enhanced technology,” said Tom Wright, the president of OZZI. “OZZI is designed for college and university campus dining centers.”

When a student orders food, the student gives the cashier a ‘token’ in exchange for the reusable, OZZI container that their food will be served in. Upon completion of the student’s meal, they bring the container to the OZZI machine located in the North End Dining facility which scans the container and spits out a token to be used for the student’s next meal. Once the machine is at capacity for containers it can hold, it will alert the staff who will then collect, clean and restock.

“As a college campus with on-going sustainability initiatives, we hope to engage the entirety of the student body and staff members to value and pursue their environmental responsibilities,” said Steve Sansola, director of student affairs at Marist.

Marist College students are estimated to waste 142 pounds of food each year. Beyond the issue of food sitting in the landfill, it is also sitting in plastic containers that can take up to 1,000 years to decompose. From noodle bowls to salads, everything is served in a single-use, disposable container at North End Dining. The OZZI machine will take these away and replace them with reusable containers.

“The impact of that waste is not often considered and therefore we do not even reach the point of thinking about how we can reduce it. That waste is taking up valuable space when stored in a landfill, polluting our air when incinerated, and negatively impacting our environment in all cases,” said Aaron Tod, a Marist College senior initiating the input of OZZI.

With the support of the Campus Sustainability Advisory Committee (CSAC) on campus and the Marist College Dining Services, the machine is set to be installed this coming June.

“This system pushes students to be aware of and accountable for the amount of waste they are producing and therefore make a personal decision to reduce that by using an OZZI container,” said Kate Cole, Sodexo marketing coordinator.

Whether students will use the machine will be determined next semester.

“I don’t see why everything needs to be on plastic plates and bowls. Most people stay and eat in the North End, so they could just have metal forks and everything else,” said Becci Casas, a Marist College student.

Due to the lack of dishwashing space in the back and students’ tendencies to steal the dishes, this is not possible. The accountability aspect of OZZI with the tokens will help solve the issue of theft.

“North End Dining serves a few thousand meals per week; if everyone were willing to do their part and choose to have their food come in a reusable container, as a Marist community, we could make a significant difference,” said Phoebe Smith, Sodexo sustainability intern.

Sodexo, Marist students, and CSAC are excited about OZZI’s potential to reduce waste on campus while positively impacting the environment.

 

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Single-use plastic noodle bowl at North End.

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Plastic forks and coffee cups used by student Brian at the North End.

 

 

Valley Cafe Adds Flavor to Tuesday

On Tuesdays, Marist College students are swapping their meal swipes into the Dining Hall for tickets into the Valley Cafe. With a different menu each week, the Valley Cafe provides students with a unique lunch and enjoyable atmosphere that keeps students returning.

“I go every week,” Caroline Friske ‘20 said. “Whenever I’m free on Tuesday, I’m here.”

Friske along with her friends, enjoy the fun variety of grilled cheese sandwiches at the cafe on Tuesday, April 23. “The grilled cheese creates a nostalgic feeling,” Friske said. “I always ate grilled cheese as a kid and it makes me very, very happy to get that feeling back.”

The theme this week at the Valley Cafe is “Grilled Cheese,” which is a yearly favorite according to student intern, Elie Christoforides ‘20. The menu includes Tomato Bisque Soup, Chicken Bacon Ranch Grilled Cheese, Brie and Pear Grilled Cheese and even a vegan grilled cheese.

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Furthermore, each week the Valley Cafe has a new theme that is chosen by student intern, Elie Christoforides. “I’m the Valley Cafe dude,” Christoforides said. He has been interning with Sodexo for three years and his role includes organizing and planning the Valley Cafe. Originally recruited to help Chef Anthony develop themes and menus each week, Christoforides is now the imagination behind the menu. “Dining services thought there was a creativity that was lacking and I was hired to be the second-hand man of Chef Anthony and give that boost of creativity,” Christoforides explained. After Chef Anthony resigned, Christoforides now decides the themes, which are either invented himself, suggestions from students or ideas pitched from clubs.

“We look at suggestions from students and we get a lot of requests from clubs,” Christoforides said. Students can either email or text Sodexo any suggestions, comments or criticisms about the Valley Cafe. Sodexo also collaborates with clubs frequently, including the Italian American Society, Fox Pride and Asian Alliance. “Whenever we get a club, I’ll make sure to talk to the leader and tell them how it works to create a menu. Sometimes they want me to make a menu and other times they’ll make their own,” Christoforides said.  

In addition to requests, Christoforides also tries to incorporate special occasions or holidays. “I think when we first started doing grilled cheese, it was National Grilled Cheese Day. It’s become an annual thing because it was so popular the first year.” If there is no specific holiday or partnership with a club, it is up to Christoforides to invent a theme. Last year, the cafe had a lunch titled, “Netflix and Grill.” The dishes were all inspired by movies or television shows such as “Ratatouille,” fruit salad from the “Wiggles” and the infamous spaghetti in “Elf.”

As a result of the interesting themes, the Valley Cafe provides students with a variety of dishes that they cannot eat elsewhere. “The Dining hall has its limitations and there’s a cap to what they do on the regular bases. Because the Valley Cafe is weekly, there’s more room for creativity,” Christoforides said.

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Moreover, the most challenging part of creating a theme is to avoid being redundant and also pleasing everyone, Christoforides explained. “It’s just one menu, so it’s going to be hard to attract everyone. There’s people that come weekly, sometimes they’re vegan or vegetarian and sometimes there are new people coming to eat for the first time,” Christoforides said. “It’s about making sure that throughout the year there is a balance between creativity and delivering the basics of a meal.”

The components of the each weekly menu include a soup, salad, three main dishes and at least one or two vegan options. Every dish is also distinctly labeled for students with allergies. Christoforides said about 50 percent of the ingredients are locally sourced within a 200 mile radius of Marist College, which supports the local economy and reduces the carbon footprint. “It is named the Valley Cafe because the food is coming from here in the Hudson Valley,” Christoforides said.  

Serving students fresh and fun lunches, the Valley Cafe invites all students to taste new cuisine they cannot eat anywhere else. Students like Friske truly enjoy their weekly routine of lunch at the Valley Cafe. Friske said, “I literally don’t take 11 o’clock classes, just so I can be here.”

Candidates Establish Themselves on the Debate Stage

Students hoping to be the next student body president had an opportunity to speak to the student body Thursday night at SGA’s Presidential Debate. Each candidate and their vice president discussed their plans for the upcoming school year and reflected on changes that took place with the current administration.

Students hoping to be the next student body president had an opportunity to speak to the student body Thursday night at SGA’s Presidential Debate. Each candidate and their vice president discussed their plans for the upcoming school year and reflected on changes that took place with the current administration.

A view of the stage before the debate

This election has three candidates from different backgrounds, diversities and interests on campus running for the office of Student Body President and Executive Vice President. The winner of the election will. Candidates include juniors Pamela Armas and Louis Higuero, juniors Mark Palmer and John Sasso and junior and sophomore Joe Sarci and Roda Mohammad. The debate was moderated by junior Tara Guainamo and Political Science professor Dr. Elizabeth Kaknes. The topics discussed range in a variety of topics from future administration to analyzing the newly approved Strategic Plan.

One of the most discussed issues of the evening was that of priority points. Some candidates were in favor of removing the system and moving to a lottery system. Mohammad mentioned “Marist has some of the best housing of all campuses. We have to remember that some people are living without a roof over their head. If where you are housed is the most pressing issue, people need to get their priorities checked”. Some candidates discussed a hybrid system of priority points and lottery. Palmer stated “By having priority points, it encourages student engagement on campus”.

Other issues of the night included discussions regarding Title IX training and the rise in sexual assault on campus. The Marist Circle reported that “two dating violence offenses, two instances of fondling, and six rapes on campus in 2017– an increase from the 4 reported for the previous two years”. Since the report, it has been a highly controversial topic on the campus and within the community. When asked about this, Sasso commented “The best way to address it is through education, you need to educate people on not only the detriment but the consequences, what you are putting that person through”.

Candidates Mark Palmer and John Sasso

Students also had an opportunity to ask questions of the candidates. When sophomore Leo Ruiz asked about what the candidates are going to do regarding disabilities on campus, Armas commented “I had a peer that is in a wheel chair that has to turn her desk around and she said it was too expensive to get a wheel chair accessbible desk. We need to make sure issues are being heard”. Palmer and Sasso also resonated that they plan to address this issue while also establishing a priority registration system for those students with disabilities.

Throughout the evening, discussions of campus issues from student life to faculty were debated and argued by the candidates. And after hours of opinions and thoughts, it will be up to the general public to cast their ballots and elect their choice of candidate.

There are three candidates who are running for the position: juniors Pamela Armas and Louis Higuero, juniors Mark Palmer and John Sasso and junior and sophomore Joe Sarci and Roda Mohammad. The debate was moderated by junior Tara Guainamo and Political Science professor Dr. Elizabeth Kaknes. The topics discussed range in a variety of topics from future administration to analyzing the newly approved Strategic Plan.

One of the most discussed issues of the evening was that of priority points. Some candidates were in favor of removing the system and moving to a lottery system. Mohammad mentioned “Marist has some of the best housing of all campuses. We have to remember that some people are living without a roof over their head. If where you are housed is the most pressing issue, people need to get their priorities checked”. Some candidates discussed a hybrid system of priority points and lottery. Palmer stated “By having priority points, it encourages student engagement on campus”.

Other issues of the night included discussions regarding Title IX training and the rise in sexual assault on campus. The Marist Circle reported that “two dating violence offenses, two instances of fondling, and six rapes on campus in 2017– an increase from the 4 reported for the previous two years”. When asked about this, Sasso commented “The best way to address it is through education, you need to educate people on not only the detriment but the consequences, what you are putting that person through”

Students also had an opportunity to ask questions of the candidates. When sophomore Leo Ruiz asked about what the candidates are going to do regarding disabilities on campus, Armas commented “I had a peer that is in a wheel chair that has to turn her desk around and she said it was too expensive to get a wheel chair accessbible desk. We need to make sure issues are being heard”. Palmer and Sasso also resonated that they plan to address this issue while also establishing a priority registration system for those students with disabilities.

Throughout the evening, discussions of campus issues from student life to faculty were debated and argued by the candidates. And after hours of opinions and thoughts, it will be up to the general public to cast their ballots and elect their choice of candidate as the next student body president.

Jessica Luther Brings Sports and Accountability to Crossroads

Marist welcomed freelance journalist Jessica Luther to campus last Tuesday night to discuss her groundbreaking discoveries on the Baylor football scandal.

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“There was nothing reported about the story when I got the tip,” said Luther.

Baylor University received a lawsuit from a graduate back in 2017 that included allegations against 31 Baylor football players for 52 separate accounts of rape between 2011 and 2014. The graduate included that she, herself, was also a victim of these allegations back in 2013. Jessica Luther was aware of many of these allegations well before when it went public back in 2017.

“I was tipped that a Baylor football player was going to trial for sexual assault in 2013,” said Luther.

According to Luther, the player had been previously dismissed at Boise State before transferring into Baylor. Those who knew the player at his former school warned Baylor about his past behavior.

“The athletic directors at Boise were very worried that he was going to hurt others,” said Luther. “Three months into his sitting year, his girlfriend reported him to the school and to the Waco Police Department. He was indicted the following summer.”

Recently, Baylor football standout defensive end Shawn Oakman was found not guilty on charges of sexual assault on February 28, 2019. Prior to these allegations, plenty of early mock drafts had Oakman projected as a first-round pick in the 2016 NFL Draft.

Luther contributed the lack of coverage from media and advocacy from the fanbase on the matter towards the religious roots that Baylor sits upon.

“Baylor is the largest Baptist university in the world,” said Luther. “The Christian underpinnings of Baylor made it hard to discuss things like this.”

If you go to Baylor’s website, you can easily find their mission which can attest to some of these Christian underpinnings that Luther was getting at. The mission states, “Baylor’s mission is to educate students for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment in a caring community.”

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Luther is known in the sports world as a top tier investigative reporter where the lines between sports and accountability tend to blur. Her detailed and lengthy coverage of this scandal is something that gave her the national recognition that she has today. She received the Halberstam Award for “sticking it to power” on the scandal along with her business partner Dan Solomon.

She now has a weekly independent feminist sports podcast called “Burn It All Down” that brings an alternative perspective to sports coverage through the female eye.

Once the story finally found its light in the media, the trickle effect immediately took place. By 2016, head football coach Art Briles had his contract terminated and Baylor University President Ken Starr resigned due to the backlash. Title IX Coordinator Patty Crawford was forced to resign as well. Jessica Luther points out her key emphasis when her reporting can create a domino effect like this one.

“I don’t want to defame,” said Luther. “I want to be as fair as I can possibly be with the information that I’ve been given.”

 

Student Driven Sustainability

In the US, 40% of all the food we produce is going to waste. One head of lettuce can take up to 25 years to decompose in a landfill. Plastic, which the majority of food is served on, is not bio degradable. 90% of the trash floating in our oceans is made of plastic. On a college campus with over 5,000 students, food and plastic are produced and served every single meal of every day. So what is Marist Dining doing to minimize waste? What are Marist students doing? 

According to the sustainability page on Sodexo’s website, “Marist Dining Services is committed to environmental stewardship by integrating awareness, local action, and regional and global thinking into planning and decision making”.

Most recently, Sodexo has invested in paper straws at the cafes on campus, as well as straw-less iced coffee cups in the Starbucks served in the library and Hancock. Sodexo Field marketing specialist, Kate Cole, says it was part of the company’s 2025 initiative, in accordance with the Sustainable [United Nations] Development goals. “It really was company wide initiative and really started to grow because as a company we are always aiming for a better tomorrow,” said Cole. Although a small step, it is still important. “The straws are a small part of the grander scheme of moving towards a more sustainable future,” said Cole.

Apart from this, Sodexo has a number of other great initiatives in place.

Local sourcing food is a top priority, which reduces energy consumption, shipping waste and greenhouse emissions. Local farms provide Marist with milk, meat, baked goods, vegetables, and produce. The main dining hall also features a brand new oil recycling process, which ensures that all the oil used when cooking is properly recycled into biodiesel and not waste. Cole says the process began this semester but has been working great so far.

This all sounds great, yet is there room for improvement?

Sophomore Mia Ridgeway, President of Marist SEED, said “One idea I stress is that there should be compost bins in the dining halls…Looking at the conveyor belt where you put dirty dishes on in the dining hall, I always see so much food being wasted. This problem really bothers me because of all the energy and environmental efforts it took to produce that food is wasted”.

Lucky for Ridgeway, two seniors have already got the ball rolling. Last Spring, Erin Todd and Tess Cimino created two compost bins outside Foy Residence Hall which allows students to turn their food waste into valuable soil for the gardens on campus. These two compost bins have now grown into an entire campus wide initiative called Marist Compost. Cimino and Todd partnered with Marist Grounds and are now attempting to get compost bins at all residence halls.

Cimino says the hope is that in the future, there will be small compost bins inside every residence building and larger ones outside. “Our goal right now is educating students on what can and can not be composted. Hopefully by providing compost bins inside the dorms, it will become second nature for people living on campus,” said Cimino. This same concept could be adapted to the dining halls as well, yet Cole says it would need further logistical planning.

Driven by students, Marist’s environmental initiatives are progressing. Both within residence halls and in the dining facilities, efforts are being made to create a more sustainable future. Hopefully, that means a little less food is sitting in a landfill and a little less plastic is floating in the ocean.

Vegetable and herb garden on campus that provides fresh produce to Marist Dining. Soil provided by Marist Compost will be used in the garden once the weather begins to warm up.

Fashion Department Forges New Path After Loss

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Everyone deals with the repercussions of death in different ways. Some grieve and mourn, while others try their best to maintain normalcy. The students of the Marist College Fashion Department are no different.

Marist was faced with the untimely death of long-time fashion professor, Richard Cramer. Kramer passed away in his sleep on the night of Feb. 27, 2019. He was found by a neighbor after he failed to show up for his 9:30 a.m. class. He was in his early 70’s, and was a Senior Professional Lecturer of Fashion. Kramer was a beloved friend and colleague of Radley Cramer, the director of the Fashion Department.

Over the past few weeks, Marist students have put together different memorials commemorating Kramer’s life. However, his loss will be felt profoundly over the rest of the semester, particularly for his students. Life surrounding the Marist Fashion department must go on, and Kramer’s students must finish their work without their beloved professor.

One of the hardest aspects of death is not just the finality, but the uncertainty. In Kramer’s absence, major questions were immediately looming over those who had to make the toughest decisions. Who would take over for Kramer? How would his students cope? Was it wrong to possess a “show must go on” mentality surrounding such a tragedy. Among those not only faced with loss, but tough decision making, is Dr. Carolyn Lepre, the Dean of the School of Communication and the Arts at Marist. “We could never replace Richard,” said Lepre. “We simply had to find someone to take his position, and that was a challenge.”

The person found to take over Kramer’s position, was ironically, someone who also knew him and worked with him years ago, former FIT professor, David Roberts. “We’re very hopeful, and I think the students will find it a very easy transition,” said Lepre.

While the transition may be easier than some given Roberts background, it’s still not the same for seniors who have to finish their capping projects without the professor who inspired them. “The whole process is going a lot differently now,” said Fashion Merchandising major, Margaret West. “For the fashion department, the springtime is very back-heavy, so a lot of major events are being affected while we all make adjustments. And on top of everything, you also need to take time to grieve.”

While the transition may inconvenient, it’s a “silver lining” among the tragedy, according to Lepre. With all the new additions coming to the fashion department, Roberts is certainly coming with his hands full. Despite any challenges, the new professor is emerging onto but also with an entirely blank canvas, with a reputation to back it up. Not to mention, Roberts’ time to shine will come soon enough; the 33rd Annual Silver Needle Fashion Show will take place on the first Sunday in May. The show was instituted in 1984, with major contributions from the late Kramer.

On top of the untimely loss of Kramer to the Marist College community, Roberts certainly has some major shoes to fill.

 

Students forced to seek new gym options

IMG_5797Ever since its original construction, the McCann Center has provided Marist students a free and convenient place to work out. However, its recent reconstruction has left students with very few options on campus to workout, and have forced many to not only travel off-campus to workout – but to pay.

The reconstruction of the McCann Center started in the summer of 2018, and is expected to be finished by the fall of 2019. This means that the only accessible parts of the McCann Center during this school year are the swimming pool, locker rooms, and basketball court – meaning no gym for students.

As an alternative, Marist set up a small gym in a tent located directly outside McCann, which is still free for students to use. But here’s the catch – due to the small size and limited equipment in the gym, the space is reserved for teams and athletes from 6 A.M. – 6 P.M., making it even tougher for non-athlete students.

Recently, Marist also created gym spaces in New Gartland Building D as well as the Marketplace (located near Upper West). However, like the tent, these spaces have significantly less space and equipment than the McCann Center once had.

Some students have decided to stick to these on-campus options, but the lack of space and equipment has caused issues.

“Since the McCann Center isn’t open this year I had to start going to the Marketplace gym space which is nice because it was redone, but sometimes it gets frustrating because since it’s small, if I go at a busy time I don’t get to do the workout I want to do,” said senior Sarah Rampulla. “Plus, the gym doesn’t have all of the equipment that the normal McCann Center had.”

These factors have led to many students seeking alternative options – many of which were off-campus and not free.

One popular option is Mike Arteaga’s Fitness Center located right across the street from Marist, in between Palace Diner and Rite Aid. Arteaga’s offers two reasonable options for students – a four-month membership for $140, or $13 every two weeks with a $40 service fee to be paid every three months.

“Arteaga’s has been a great alternative option for the McCann Center this year, as it’s close to campus, and has a ton of space and equipment that lets me complete my workouts pretty easily,” said senior Mike Ianelli. “The only downside of it is having to pay, which is frustrating considering we pay so much tuition at Marist and they can’t provide a better gym option.”

Another option students have chose is Crunch Fitness, located about 15 minutes down Route 9. Crunch offers a membership for $20 a month, which also includes a free guest and free hydro massage and tanning.

“I love the openness of Crunch, and I also love how new the equipment is and how clean the gym as a whole is,” said senior Nick Palumbo. “The only issue is that it’s a far commute and obviously that I have to pay instead of working out for free at McCann.”

Despite the inconvenience of the McCann reconstruction, students are doing everything they can to stay in shape.

Singers Benefit Concert Donates Money to Center for Autism

The Singer’s annual “Love in the Afternoon” benefit concert on March 9th and March 10th raised an impressive $4,000 for the Anderson Center for Autism.

“We were really happy with how much we were able to donate,” said Singers President, Nicki Barrett.

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Singers President, Nicki Barrett singing her solo,”One and Only”

The donation will go towards the services at the Anderson Center that support the children and adults with autism who thrive through their programs.

“We have a many long years partnership with Marist College and this is yet another way we partner to improve the lives of all of our community members,” expressed the center’s Program Development Manager, Christine Wolcott.

This year’s concert took place at Marist College in the Nelly Goletti Theatre and included 30 performances, featuring the 180 members of the Marist Singers Program. The set list had a wide variety, as there were solos, duets, and small group performances. Among those small groups were The Enharmonics, Sirens, and Time Check, which are the three acapella groups at Marist. Each song performed was connected with the same theme: love.

The show opened with the entire Singers group singing “”Somebody to Love.”  Some of the other iconic love songs performed were, “I Wanna Love You,” “Signed, Sealed, Delivered,” and “I Love you Always Forever.”

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Singers group performing the opening song, “Somebody to Love”

The annual concert has always placed an emphasis on this theme of love, because each year they select a different organization to raise money for.

“We decided on the Anderson Center this year because we had a lot of connections with the center already.” We knew that a few people in Singers have family members with autism, and two of our board members are studying Special Education.” said Barrett. “Plus, the organization is local so we can physically go there and perform and interact with people we’re helping.”

“What was cool was that two of our board members held an educational seminar for Autism so that everyone in Singer’s was more informed about the people and cause we were donating to,” said Tori Schubert, a junior singers member. Special Education majors, Dylan O’Brien and Max O’Handley felt it was important for everyone to be educated about Autism so that they could really put their whole heart into it.

During the show, Sarah William, the director of Choral Activities, came out to thank everyone that had been involved, and to show appreciation towards those who came. She also spoke passionately about the fact that every year, the “fabrics of each singers hearts weave together” to produce a show that will benefit an amazing cause.

Marist College’s Autism Speaks club also worked with Singers to support the event. On the days of the concert they had a table set up at the front of the house and were available to give out information to those interested.

Schubert stated, “I really like the “Love in the Afternoon” concert because we always support a really great cause, and it’s nice because it’s not about us. It’s about helping other people and touching other people’s hearts. It feels it really good to do that.”