Valley Cafe Adds Flavor to Tuesday

On Tuesdays, Marist College students are swapping their meal swipes into the Dining Hall for tickets into the Valley Cafe. With a different menu each week, the Valley Cafe provides students with a unique lunch and enjoyable atmosphere that keeps students returning.

“I go every week,” Caroline Friske ‘20 said. “Whenever I’m free on Tuesday, I’m here.”

Friske along with her friends, enjoy the fun variety of grilled cheese sandwiches at the cafe on Tuesday, April 23. “The grilled cheese creates a nostalgic feeling,” Friske said. “I always ate grilled cheese as a kid and it makes me very, very happy to get that feeling back.”

The theme this week at the Valley Cafe is “Grilled Cheese,” which is a yearly favorite according to student intern, Elie Christoforides ‘20. The menu includes Tomato Bisque Soup, Chicken Bacon Ranch Grilled Cheese, Brie and Pear Grilled Cheese and even a vegan grilled cheese.

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Furthermore, each week the Valley Cafe has a new theme that is chosen by student intern, Elie Christoforides. “I’m the Valley Cafe dude,” Christoforides said. He has been interning with Sodexo for three years and his role includes organizing and planning the Valley Cafe. Originally recruited to help Chef Anthony develop themes and menus each week, Christoforides is now the imagination behind the menu. “Dining services thought there was a creativity that was lacking and I was hired to be the second-hand man of Chef Anthony and give that boost of creativity,” Christoforides explained. After Chef Anthony resigned, Christoforides now decides the themes, which are either invented himself, suggestions from students or ideas pitched from clubs.

“We look at suggestions from students and we get a lot of requests from clubs,” Christoforides said. Students can either email or text Sodexo any suggestions, comments or criticisms about the Valley Cafe. Sodexo also collaborates with clubs frequently, including the Italian American Society, Fox Pride and Asian Alliance. “Whenever we get a club, I’ll make sure to talk to the leader and tell them how it works to create a menu. Sometimes they want me to make a menu and other times they’ll make their own,” Christoforides said.  

In addition to requests, Christoforides also tries to incorporate special occasions or holidays. “I think when we first started doing grilled cheese, it was National Grilled Cheese Day. It’s become an annual thing because it was so popular the first year.” If there is no specific holiday or partnership with a club, it is up to Christoforides to invent a theme. Last year, the cafe had a lunch titled, “Netflix and Grill.” The dishes were all inspired by movies or television shows such as “Ratatouille,” fruit salad from the “Wiggles” and the infamous spaghetti in “Elf.”

As a result of the interesting themes, the Valley Cafe provides students with a variety of dishes that they cannot eat elsewhere. “The Dining hall has its limitations and there’s a cap to what they do on the regular bases. Because the Valley Cafe is weekly, there’s more room for creativity,” Christoforides said.

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Moreover, the most challenging part of creating a theme is to avoid being redundant and also pleasing everyone, Christoforides explained. “It’s just one menu, so it’s going to be hard to attract everyone. There’s people that come weekly, sometimes they’re vegan or vegetarian and sometimes there are new people coming to eat for the first time,” Christoforides said. “It’s about making sure that throughout the year there is a balance between creativity and delivering the basics of a meal.”

The components of the each weekly menu include a soup, salad, three main dishes and at least one or two vegan options. Every dish is also distinctly labeled for students with allergies. Christoforides said about 50 percent of the ingredients are locally sourced within a 200 mile radius of Marist College, which supports the local economy and reduces the carbon footprint. “It is named the Valley Cafe because the food is coming from here in the Hudson Valley,” Christoforides said.  

Serving students fresh and fun lunches, the Valley Cafe invites all students to taste new cuisine they cannot eat anywhere else. Students like Friske truly enjoy their weekly routine of lunch at the Valley Cafe. Friske said, “I literally don’t take 11 o’clock classes, just so I can be here.”

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Candidates Establish Themselves on the Debate Stage

Students hoping to be the next student body president had an opportunity to speak to the student body Thursday night at SGA’s Presidential Debate. Each candidate and their vice president discussed their plans for the upcoming school year and reflected on changes that took place with the current administration.

Students hoping to be the next student body president had an opportunity to speak to the student body Thursday night at SGA’s Presidential Debate. Each candidate and their vice president discussed their plans for the upcoming school year and reflected on changes that took place with the current administration.

A view of the stage before the debate

This election has three candidates from different backgrounds, diversities and interests on campus running for the office of Student Body President and Executive Vice President. The winner of the election will. Candidates include juniors Pamela Armas and Louis Higuero, juniors Mark Palmer and John Sasso and junior and sophomore Joe Sarci and Roda Mohammad. The debate was moderated by junior Tara Guainamo and Political Science professor Dr. Elizabeth Kaknes. The topics discussed range in a variety of topics from future administration to analyzing the newly approved Strategic Plan.

One of the most discussed issues of the evening was that of priority points. Some candidates were in favor of removing the system and moving to a lottery system. Mohammad mentioned “Marist has some of the best housing of all campuses. We have to remember that some people are living without a roof over their head. If where you are housed is the most pressing issue, people need to get their priorities checked”. Some candidates discussed a hybrid system of priority points and lottery. Palmer stated “By having priority points, it encourages student engagement on campus”.

Other issues of the night included discussions regarding Title IX training and the rise in sexual assault on campus. The Marist Circle reported that “two dating violence offenses, two instances of fondling, and six rapes on campus in 2017– an increase from the 4 reported for the previous two years”. Since the report, it has been a highly controversial topic on the campus and within the community. When asked about this, Sasso commented “The best way to address it is through education, you need to educate people on not only the detriment but the consequences, what you are putting that person through”.

Candidates Mark Palmer and John Sasso

Students also had an opportunity to ask questions of the candidates. When sophomore Leo Ruiz asked about what the candidates are going to do regarding disabilities on campus, Armas commented “I had a peer that is in a wheel chair that has to turn her desk around and she said it was too expensive to get a wheel chair accessbible desk. We need to make sure issues are being heard”. Palmer and Sasso also resonated that they plan to address this issue while also establishing a priority registration system for those students with disabilities.

Throughout the evening, discussions of campus issues from student life to faculty were debated and argued by the candidates. And after hours of opinions and thoughts, it will be up to the general public to cast their ballots and elect their choice of candidate.

There are three candidates who are running for the position: juniors Pamela Armas and Louis Higuero, juniors Mark Palmer and John Sasso and junior and sophomore Joe Sarci and Roda Mohammad. The debate was moderated by junior Tara Guainamo and Political Science professor Dr. Elizabeth Kaknes. The topics discussed range in a variety of topics from future administration to analyzing the newly approved Strategic Plan.

One of the most discussed issues of the evening was that of priority points. Some candidates were in favor of removing the system and moving to a lottery system. Mohammad mentioned “Marist has some of the best housing of all campuses. We have to remember that some people are living without a roof over their head. If where you are housed is the most pressing issue, people need to get their priorities checked”. Some candidates discussed a hybrid system of priority points and lottery. Palmer stated “By having priority points, it encourages student engagement on campus”.

Other issues of the night included discussions regarding Title IX training and the rise in sexual assault on campus. The Marist Circle reported that “two dating violence offenses, two instances of fondling, and six rapes on campus in 2017– an increase from the 4 reported for the previous two years”. When asked about this, Sasso commented “The best way to address it is through education, you need to educate people on not only the detriment but the consequences, what you are putting that person through”

Students also had an opportunity to ask questions of the candidates. When sophomore Leo Ruiz asked about what the candidates are going to do regarding disabilities on campus, Armas commented “I had a peer that is in a wheel chair that has to turn her desk around and she said it was too expensive to get a wheel chair accessbible desk. We need to make sure issues are being heard”. Palmer and Sasso also resonated that they plan to address this issue while also establishing a priority registration system for those students with disabilities.

Throughout the evening, discussions of campus issues from student life to faculty were debated and argued by the candidates. And after hours of opinions and thoughts, it will be up to the general public to cast their ballots and elect their choice of candidate as the next student body president.

Jessica Luther Brings Sports and Accountability to Crossroads

Marist welcomed freelance journalist Jessica Luther to campus last Tuesday night to discuss her groundbreaking discoveries on the Baylor football scandal.

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“There was nothing reported about the story when I got the tip,” said Luther.

Baylor University received a lawsuit from a graduate back in 2017 that included allegations against 31 Baylor football players for 52 separate accounts of rape between 2011 and 2014. The graduate included that she, herself, was also a victim of these allegations back in 2013. Jessica Luther was aware of many of these allegations well before when it went public back in 2017.

“I was tipped that a Baylor football player was going to trial for sexual assault in 2013,” said Luther.

According to Luther, the player had been previously dismissed at Boise State before transferring into Baylor. Those who knew the player at his former school warned Baylor about his past behavior.

“The athletic directors at Boise were very worried that he was going to hurt others,” said Luther. “Three months into his sitting year, his girlfriend reported him to the school and to the Waco Police Department. He was indicted the following summer.”

Recently, Baylor football standout defensive end Shawn Oakman was found not guilty on charges of sexual assault on February 28, 2019. Prior to these allegations, plenty of early mock drafts had Oakman projected as a first-round pick in the 2016 NFL Draft.

Luther contributed the lack of coverage from media and advocacy from the fanbase on the matter towards the religious roots that Baylor sits upon.

“Baylor is the largest Baptist university in the world,” said Luther. “The Christian underpinnings of Baylor made it hard to discuss things like this.”

If you go to Baylor’s website, you can easily find their mission which can attest to some of these Christian underpinnings that Luther was getting at. The mission states, “Baylor’s mission is to educate students for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment in a caring community.”

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Luther is known in the sports world as a top tier investigative reporter where the lines between sports and accountability tend to blur. Her detailed and lengthy coverage of this scandal is something that gave her the national recognition that she has today. She received the Halberstam Award for “sticking it to power” on the scandal along with her business partner Dan Solomon.

She now has a weekly independent feminist sports podcast called “Burn It All Down” that brings an alternative perspective to sports coverage through the female eye.

Once the story finally found its light in the media, the trickle effect immediately took place. By 2016, head football coach Art Briles had his contract terminated and Baylor University President Ken Starr resigned due to the backlash. Title IX Coordinator Patty Crawford was forced to resign as well. Jessica Luther points out her key emphasis when her reporting can create a domino effect like this one.

“I don’t want to defame,” said Luther. “I want to be as fair as I can possibly be with the information that I’ve been given.”

 

Student Driven Sustainability

In the US, 40% of all the food we produce is going to waste. One head of lettuce can take up to 25 years to decompose in a landfill. Plastic, which the majority of food is served on, is not bio degradable. 90% of the trash floating in our oceans is made of plastic. On a college campus with over 5,000 students, food and plastic are produced and served every single meal of every day. So what is Marist Dining doing to minimize waste? What are Marist students doing? 

According to the sustainability page on Sodexo’s website, “Marist Dining Services is committed to environmental stewardship by integrating awareness, local action, and regional and global thinking into planning and decision making”.

Most recently, Sodexo has invested in paper straws at the cafes on campus, as well as straw-less iced coffee cups in the Starbucks served in the library and Hancock. Sodexo Field marketing specialist, Kate Cole, says it was part of the company’s 2025 initiative, in accordance with the Sustainable [United Nations] Development goals. “It really was company wide initiative and really started to grow because as a company we are always aiming for a better tomorrow,” said Cole. Although a small step, it is still important. “The straws are a small part of the grander scheme of moving towards a more sustainable future,” said Cole.

Apart from this, Sodexo has a number of other great initiatives in place.

Local sourcing food is a top priority, which reduces energy consumption, shipping waste and greenhouse emissions. Local farms provide Marist with milk, meat, baked goods, vegetables, and produce. The main dining hall also features a brand new oil recycling process, which ensures that all the oil used when cooking is properly recycled into biodiesel and not waste. Cole says the process began this semester but has been working great so far.

This all sounds great, yet is there room for improvement?

Sophomore Mia Ridgeway, President of Marist SEED, said “One idea I stress is that there should be compost bins in the dining halls…Looking at the conveyor belt where you put dirty dishes on in the dining hall, I always see so much food being wasted. This problem really bothers me because of all the energy and environmental efforts it took to produce that food is wasted”.

Lucky for Ridgeway, two seniors have already got the ball rolling. Last Spring, Erin Todd and Tess Cimino created two compost bins outside Foy Residence Hall which allows students to turn their food waste into valuable soil for the gardens on campus. These two compost bins have now grown into an entire campus wide initiative called Marist Compost. Cimino and Todd partnered with Marist Grounds and are now attempting to get compost bins at all residence halls.

Cimino says the hope is that in the future, there will be small compost bins inside every residence building and larger ones outside. “Our goal right now is educating students on what can and can not be composted. Hopefully by providing compost bins inside the dorms, it will become second nature for people living on campus,” said Cimino. This same concept could be adapted to the dining halls as well, yet Cole says it would need further logistical planning.

Driven by students, Marist’s environmental initiatives are progressing. Both within residence halls and in the dining facilities, efforts are being made to create a more sustainable future. Hopefully, that means a little less food is sitting in a landfill and a little less plastic is floating in the ocean.

Vegetable and herb garden on campus that provides fresh produce to Marist Dining. Soil provided by Marist Compost will be used in the garden once the weather begins to warm up.

Students forced to seek new gym options

IMG_5797Ever since its original construction, the McCann Center has provided Marist students a free and convenient place to work out. However, its recent reconstruction has left students with very few options on campus to workout, and have forced many to not only travel off-campus to workout – but to pay.

The reconstruction of the McCann Center started in the summer of 2018, and is expected to be finished by the fall of 2019. This means that the only accessible parts of the McCann Center during this school year are the swimming pool, locker rooms, and basketball court – meaning no gym for students.

As an alternative, Marist set up a small gym in a tent located directly outside McCann, which is still free for students to use. But here’s the catch – due to the small size and limited equipment in the gym, the space is reserved for teams and athletes from 6 A.M. – 6 P.M., making it even tougher for non-athlete students.

Recently, Marist also created gym spaces in New Gartland Building D as well as the Marketplace (located near Upper West). However, like the tent, these spaces have significantly less space and equipment than the McCann Center once had.

Some students have decided to stick to these on-campus options, but the lack of space and equipment has caused issues.

“Since the McCann Center isn’t open this year I had to start going to the Marketplace gym space which is nice because it was redone, but sometimes it gets frustrating because since it’s small, if I go at a busy time I don’t get to do the workout I want to do,” said senior Sarah Rampulla. “Plus, the gym doesn’t have all of the equipment that the normal McCann Center had.”

These factors have led to many students seeking alternative options – many of which were off-campus and not free.

One popular option is Mike Arteaga’s Fitness Center located right across the street from Marist, in between Palace Diner and Rite Aid. Arteaga’s offers two reasonable options for students – a four-month membership for $140, or $13 every two weeks with a $40 service fee to be paid every three months.

“Arteaga’s has been a great alternative option for the McCann Center this year, as it’s close to campus, and has a ton of space and equipment that lets me complete my workouts pretty easily,” said senior Mike Ianelli. “The only downside of it is having to pay, which is frustrating considering we pay so much tuition at Marist and they can’t provide a better gym option.”

Another option students have chose is Crunch Fitness, located about 15 minutes down Route 9. Crunch offers a membership for $20 a month, which also includes a free guest and free hydro massage and tanning.

“I love the openness of Crunch, and I also love how new the equipment is and how clean the gym as a whole is,” said senior Nick Palumbo. “The only issue is that it’s a far commute and obviously that I have to pay instead of working out for free at McCann.”

Despite the inconvenience of the McCann reconstruction, students are doing everything they can to stay in shape.

Singers Benefit Concert Donates Money to Center for Autism

The Singer’s annual “Love in the Afternoon” benefit concert on March 9th and March 10th raised an impressive $4,000 for the Anderson Center for Autism.

“We were really happy with how much we were able to donate,” said Singers President, Nicki Barrett.

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Singers President, Nicki Barrett singing her solo,”One and Only”

The donation will go towards the services at the Anderson Center that support the children and adults with autism who thrive through their programs.

“We have a many long years partnership with Marist College and this is yet another way we partner to improve the lives of all of our community members,” expressed the center’s Program Development Manager, Christine Wolcott.

This year’s concert took place at Marist College in the Nelly Goletti Theatre and included 30 performances, featuring the 180 members of the Marist Singers Program. The set list had a wide variety, as there were solos, duets, and small group performances. Among those small groups were The Enharmonics, Sirens, and Time Check, which are the three acapella groups at Marist. Each song performed was connected with the same theme: love.

The show opened with the entire Singers group singing “”Somebody to Love.”  Some of the other iconic love songs performed were, “I Wanna Love You,” “Signed, Sealed, Delivered,” and “I Love you Always Forever.”

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Singers group performing the opening song, “Somebody to Love”

The annual concert has always placed an emphasis on this theme of love, because each year they select a different organization to raise money for.

“We decided on the Anderson Center this year because we had a lot of connections with the center already.” We knew that a few people in Singers have family members with autism, and two of our board members are studying Special Education.” said Barrett. “Plus, the organization is local so we can physically go there and perform and interact with people we’re helping.”

“What was cool was that two of our board members held an educational seminar for Autism so that everyone in Singer’s was more informed about the people and cause we were donating to,” said Tori Schubert, a junior singers member. Special Education majors, Dylan O’Brien and Max O’Handley felt it was important for everyone to be educated about Autism so that they could really put their whole heart into it.

During the show, Sarah William, the director of Choral Activities, came out to thank everyone that had been involved, and to show appreciation towards those who came. She also spoke passionately about the fact that every year, the “fabrics of each singers hearts weave together” to produce a show that will benefit an amazing cause.

Marist College’s Autism Speaks club also worked with Singers to support the event. On the days of the concert they had a table set up at the front of the house and were available to give out information to those interested.

Schubert stated, “I really like the “Love in the Afternoon” concert because we always support a really great cause, and it’s nice because it’s not about us. It’s about helping other people and touching other people’s hearts. It feels it really good to do that.”

 

Higher Education Programs Face Budget Cuts

Back in January the governor proposed budget cuts to educational programs statewide.

“For HEOP specifically, there is a proposed cut of approximately $6 million” said Mary Canto Rice Assistant Director of the Center for Multicultural Affairs/HEOP.

Some other programs included, “NYS Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), Enhanced Tuition Assistance Awards (ETA), Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP), Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (C-STEP), Liberty Partnership Programs (LPP) and the Foster Youth Care Success Initiative (FYCSI)” according to Rice.

In addition the Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) is expected to lose $6 million dollars from their overall budget which is $41 million. After budget cuts the state funded program would be left with an overall budget of $35 million dollars annually. Students that are enrolled in the HEOP program also receive financial support from the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) in addition to their HEOP financial package.

“It is difficult to predict how the cuts could affect HEOP students until the budget has been passed and programs know exactly how much funding they have to work with” Rice said.

The HEOP program is designed to provide New York State students with a range of resources throughout their college career. Students enrolled in the HEOP program would otherwise not be able to attend college due to their academic or financial circumstances.

HEOP is similar to other Educational Opportunity Programs (EOP), the difference between the two is EOP is for state schools in the SUNY system while HEOP is for private institutions. Private college institutions that house HEOP programs are responsible for providing students with academic support, assistance in paying for their tuition, supplemental financial aid, and providing any additional funds needed to complete the student’s graduation requirements.

Students who apply for the HEOP program will indicate this in their college common application. In order to be accepted into the HEOP program students must meet both the financial criteria for the household along with the academic requirements. Students are offered admission to the program without regard to their race, religious affiliation, disability status, marital status, or their sexual orientation.

Although the budget has not been finalized as of yet, Rice is moving forward, “I have been involved with HEOP specifically for about 15 years.  It is challenging to have to deal with proposed cuts but that comes with the territory of working with state-funded programs sometimes.”

Despite the idea of possible budget cuts looming in the air Rice chose to keep her head up and look at the positives. “HEOP is an overwhelmingly successful program; we have 50 years of documented data that supports what our advocacy message is: “HEOP WORKS.”

In the fall 2019 semester the HEOP program will be celebrating 50 year of success and achievement. This event is one staff and students are looking forward to celebrating.

Darriel McBride, HEOP alum says, “I look forward to celebrating 50 years of HEOP because if it wasn’t for HEOP I would have not been able to attended college.”

Rice wants to ease the tensions of current enrolled students that way they will be able to focus on what is important and that is their education.

She offers these tips for HEOP students, “Stay informed. Educate others. Be an advocate. Stay positive. HEOP is celebrating 50 years of success and we are planning to be here for another 50!”

Marist Fashion Mourns Senior Professor

Senior Professional Lecturer of Fashion, Richard Kramer, died in his sleep, the night of Feb. 27, 2019. He was in his early 70’s. Students and faculty who knew him say Kramer was an outstanding professor that impacted student lives beyond the classroom.

Radley Cramer, the Director of the Marist Fashion Program, was a close friend, and colleague, of Kramer for more than a decade. Cramer had a contact that was able to check on Kramer and reported back on his passing. Kramer had a career in teaching at Marist of nearly 20 years and was described by Cramer as “a longstanding pillar of the Fashion Program.”

Kramer was described as someone who was larger than life, which caused him to live a life that was anything but ordinary.

Cramer said:

“As a specialist in costume history, Richard represented the classic “sage on the stage” — presenting engaging, sometimes very entertaining theatrical descriptions of historical periods and how fashion reflected the spirit of the times. He brought the history of costume to life. He was an expert, with precise presentation and master of his teaching. He added a lot of emotion, which the faculty admired.”

 

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Kramer (Left) with Cramer (Right) Photo Courtesy of Marist Fashion

Josiah Turbak, a senior fashion merchandising student, was a student of Kramer in previous semesters. Turbak desired Kramer to be extremely caring and thoughtful and was the kind of professor that was always willing to stay after class with students.

Michaela Ceci, now a senior fashion student, had Kramer during her first semester as a freshman and again last semester. “He really helped me grow as a student. He was one of my favorite teachers honestly because he really taught with his heart and soul.  His class was like story time, throughout the whole period I would be captivated and it made it so much easier for me to learn and retain the information. That really set him apart for me.”

An aspect of Kramer’s teaching that many students of his commented on, was his efforts in building a relationship with his students, and his encouragement of student opinions.

“He really wanted to hear our opinion on things and share things we were passionate about to the class,” said Ceci.

 

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Photo Courtesy of Marist Fashion

Turbak describes Kramer’s teaching to be rare, saying he would speak about life more than the lessons. Kramer focused on how things will be used in the world after college, and what students can and should take away from everything they are experiences. Turbak concurs to Ceci experience with Kramer by speaking of how Kramer would ask for their opinions on topics beyond the classroom. Kramer was engaged in what was going on and put forth efforts to keep himself engaged.

Kramer retired in 2017, however, he still continued to teach two courses, History of Costume and History of Modern Fashion. Both these classes are noted for having students of various majors, stemming far beyond just the fashion department. Cramer will be taking over his classes for the remainder of the semester.

Kramer will be greatly missed by faculty and students, beyond just the fashion program. As Cramer said, “Somewhere Richard is rehearsing a new play, planning a show or telling a great story.”

 

Being a Non-Racist isn’t Good Enough in the Mind of Author

Ibram X. Kendi took the stage of the Nelly Goletti Theater on March 13 to promote his new book, “How to be an Anti Racist.”

Kendi, who was originally Ibram H. Rogers is an author and scholar of African American studies. He received his undergraduate degree in journalism and African american studies from Florida A&M. He then went on to receive his doctorate in African american studies from Temple University.

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Image courtesy of billmoyers.com.

Kendi stood in the glow of the spotlights on the Nelly Goletti stage preaching one thing, “All racial ideas, all policies, and all people are either being racist or anti racists,” Kendi said.

Kendi wanted to exemplify what a non-racist is and what an anti-racist should be. While both of these titles seem to say the same thing, there is a difference that Kendi made abundantly clear. He lead with a simple question, “What is a non-racist?,” and began to concrete the point his book is written about.

The concept of even being a non-racist is inherently racist in itself, even to acknowledge the fact that there is another side is racist in itself, Kendi summarized. Kendi then brought a real example from his life, which is the initial chapter of his book.

When he realized he did not want to become a journalist with his degree he began to think of a professorial path. That required a GRE, so he enrolled in a Kaplan class at Florida State University under the impression this course would make him smarter, but a different result occurred.

“This instructor wasn’t teaching me a tremendous amount of vocabulary,” Kendi said. Kendi initially thought that was the goal of the course so he could improve the promised 200 points on the GRE. A separate occurrence happen though — “This instructor was teaching us how to take the course,” Kendi said, “She was teaching me form.”

That’s what Kendi believes is why the black community is consistently look at as a ‘inferior race’. Repeatedly Kendi reinforced the idea that minority students don’t achieve less than white students because they are genetically inferior, “It’s because of the nature,” Kendi said. He then said white people are intellectually superior because the nature of existence and never been persecuted for their skin color.

Kendi then introduced two varying ways of thing. The first being a segregationist ideal where, “These ideas are a function of God’s law,” Kendi said. The second being the assimilationists who believe the nature and environment should be changing and adapting.

In the end, Kendi took the talk political of how to get these racist ideals and policies to change so everyone can take on an anti-racist mindset. “As someone who is expressing a racist idea or supporting a racial policy through an action or even inaction. If you are doing nothing in the face of racist policies,” Kendi said, “then you’re not different than the person who put that policy in place.”

Racism is caused by the nature of the United States and in order to change that there will have to be change from an institutional level.

Having practically filled the Nelly Goletti with students and professors, his points came across clear, and his inherent knowledge was well received.

“The not-so-subtle genius of Kendi’s ideology stems from the idea that anyone is able to re-train and re-wire their mindsets and preconceived notions to be an anti-racist,” Liam Doerr ’20 said.

The idea of being an anti-racist wasn’t in the minds of students prior to the lecture, rather they just saw themselves as a non-racist; a big difference in the mind of Kendi. While the ideology of being a non-racist is good, people have the inherent humanistic ability to “re-wrire” their brains according to Doerr and take on a more driven anti-racist agenda, which promotes social and political change, not just stagnation.

Fake IDs – Ticket to Social Life or Just a Ticket?

Marist College students are apprehensive to use their fake IDs after the bar raid in December, but are still continuing to frequent the Poughkeepsie bars. 

“Personally, 90% of my social life is going to the bar. It’s where majority of people go on the weekends,” Geoffrey Chun ‘21 said. On a Friday night, Chun would choose to go to Darby O’Gills instead of a house party. “House parties only cater to a certain demographic or group of friends,” Chun said.

For many students, the raid at Darby O’Gills has not had a substantial impact on their weekend plans. “The raid didn’t change the party scene at Marist,” Justin Olson ‘21 said.

“As an incoming freshman, you’re taught Marist is a bar school,” Jordan Mogel ‘21 said. “You’re pressured into getting a fake ID,” Mogel explained.

According to students, group orders are placed on websites such as IDgod, IDsolo, IDviking, IDbuddy and Fakeyourdrank. Prices range between $40 and $60 for two IDs. One student said, “The IDs are definitely coming from China.”

Currently Marist College is labeled as a “bar school.” However there are students who would like to see that change. Students hope to see the bar scene decrease with the substitution of more parties. “I wish there were more house parties,” Mogel said, “Students want more house parties, but there just aren’t any.”

Similarly, Jason Davis ‘21 would also like to hear of more parties on the weekend. Davis explained that although it is not a party school now, Marist College may become one if the bars continue to be raided.

Nonetheless, Devon Marinello ‘21 agrees the Poughkeepsie bars currently have a pivotal role in the social life at Marist College. “The bars are the social scene,” Marinello said. Although worried there may be another raid issued by the New York State Liquor Authorities, Marinello still frequents the Poughkeepsie bars.

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The New York State Liquor Authorities ticketed one hundred and fifteen Marist College students for possessing a false identification card in December. However individuals under 21 still make their way to the bars on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.

An underage student stated, “I’m definitely concerned about the bars being raided again. I’m just trying to limit going out personally – reduce the time I spend at the bar to limit the chance of getting caught in a raid.” 

Another underage student said, “I would say I’m concerned, but it isn’t going to stop me from going to the bar.”

However, for the few students like Zac James ‘21 and Aidan Diver ‘21, the raid has had a significant impact on their weekend plans. James and Diver, former Darby O’Gills regulars, no longer go to the bar. “It’s not worth going,” James said.

Following the raid at Darby O’Gills in December, Diver said, “I just thought holy shit, thank God we weren’t there.”

Similarly, Mogel is concerned how any ticket would look on his record. Mogel said, “I’m never going out again. I’m trying to go to law school.”

Furthermore students using a fake ID do not believe it is the quality of the false identification card. Rather students feel the bar owners and bouncers turn a blind eye to make a larger profit. Olson said, “The bars are just trying to make money. They know everyone is underage.”

Twenty-two-year-old Sam Goldman ‘19, explains he often recognizes students under the age of 21 at the bars. He said, “The bars want capital and part of it may be underage kids are growing facial hair and there are some very mature-looking women, but the owners want to make as much money as they can.”

Currently, the bars remain at the center of the social scene at Marist College, even for students under the age of 21. For a night of fun and socializing, students are willing to run the risk of being ticketed.

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Darby O’Gills accepts Marist Money