Marist Basketball Manager Talks Experience So far

If you were to walk around the Marist College Main campus located in Poughkeepsie New York you would see many students in athletics attire with backpacks with their jersey number on it and what sport the student plays. But what you don’t see is who are the managers of the team

IMG_1578Sean McGee the 20-year-old Sophomore just conclude is second year as a manager for the Marist men’s basketball team and there many duties he must due as a manager for the Men’s Basketball team.

“My duties as a manger are that I have to film games and practices when they happen and after games conclude I have to make sure that both coaches get the game film” said McGee “Also I have to make sure that all the players have all their equipment”. Another duty that must McGee must do is making sure all the players and coaches food orders are in for when the team is on the road away.

.Also, in those two years McGee was part of two different coaching staffs in his freshman year he was part of Former head coach Mike Maker final season. McGee said regardless of the record that happen that he still really enjoyed the season and that he learned a lot under coach Maker. He recalls his best memory from that season “The best memory from that season was when we went down to Manahan after losing to them at home in overtime” said McGee “Ryan Funk hit a game winning three and the locker room was so intergenic and we knew that winning wasn’t a fluke.”

Now with his first year under new head coach John Dunne he reflects on the season. Under Dunne McGee says there were stressful times threw out the season especially when it came to traveling. But with Stressful times comes the positives the Men’s Basketball team won the Samson Bracket Championship in the Belfast Classic. With Marist winning the tournament Senior Guard Brian Parker was named the MVP of the tournament.

McGee is also happy with the culture that Dunne has brought in and that the staff he has brought in welcoming and he knows if he has any questions that he knows he can go to them with them.  he also reflects on what is like being part of the team and being a manger.

“You get to build these special bounds with the players they are like your second family” said McGee “As a manger we are seen as equal people as part of the team it makes us feel important to the program.” McGee later went on to say the it’s a learning experience you can like every day and see in practices in what they do and take away and gain valuable knowledge.

McGee is a 100% sure they he will return is junior year and be a manger once again and say that he might be getting more responsibility’s some include setting up practices with opposing teams when they go on the road this includes calling the Director of Men’s basketball operations and it would be vice versa.

When McGee is not with the basketball team or in class he spends time with his friends working on a brand-new music streaming app called Haven Music. “It will be a app that uses blockchain technology to give artist royalty payments instantaneously, eliminating a 6-12 month wait time for mere dollars” said McGee “We want to give artist more tools to be successful in the music streaming industry. McGee said that him and his friends thinks there is a problem with the music industry and they want to fix it.

 

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McGee and his partners after their bussiness meeting back in March

 

 

 

 

 

Fashion Department Forges New Path After Loss

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Everyone deals with the repercussions of death in different ways. Some grieve and mourn, while others try their best to maintain normalcy. The students of the Marist College Fashion Department are no different.

Marist was faced with the untimely death of long-time fashion professor, Richard Cramer. Kramer passed away in his sleep on the night of Feb. 27, 2019. He was found by a neighbor after he failed to show up for his 9:30 a.m. class. He was in his early 70’s, and was a Senior Professional Lecturer of Fashion. Kramer was a beloved friend and colleague of Radley Cramer, the director of the Fashion Department.

Over the past few weeks, Marist students have put together different memorials commemorating Kramer’s life. However, his loss will be felt profoundly over the rest of the semester, particularly for his students. Life surrounding the Marist Fashion department must go on, and Kramer’s students must finish their work without their beloved professor.

One of the hardest aspects of death is not just the finality, but the uncertainty. In Kramer’s absence, major questions were immediately looming over those who had to make the toughest decisions. Who would take over for Kramer? How would his students cope? Was it wrong to possess a “show must go on” mentality surrounding such a tragedy. Among those not only faced with loss, but tough decision making, is Dr. Carolyn Lepre, the Dean of the School of Communication and the Arts at Marist. “We could never replace Richard,” said Lepre. “We simply had to find someone to take his position, and that was a challenge.”

The person found to take over Kramer’s position, was ironically, someone who also knew him and worked with him years ago, former FIT professor, David Roberts. “We’re very hopeful, and I think the students will find it a very easy transition,” said Lepre.

While the transition may be easier than some given Roberts background, it’s still not the same for seniors who have to finish their capping projects without the professor who inspired them. “The whole process is going a lot differently now,” said Fashion Merchandising major, Margaret West. “For the fashion department, the springtime is very back-heavy, so a lot of major events are being affected while we all make adjustments. And on top of everything, you also need to take time to grieve.”

While the transition may inconvenient, it’s a “silver lining” among the tragedy, according to Lepre. With all the new additions coming to the fashion department, Roberts is certainly coming with his hands full. Despite any challenges, the new professor is emerging onto but also with an entirely blank canvas, with a reputation to back it up. Not to mention, Roberts’ time to shine will come soon enough; the 33rd Annual Silver Needle Fashion Show will take place on the first Sunday in May. The show was instituted in 1984, with major contributions from the late Kramer.

On top of the untimely loss of Kramer to the Marist College community, Roberts certainly has some major shoes to fill.

 

The End of Priority Points at Marist?

Marist College’s famed priority points system’s time at the school may be up, as ideas for implementing a new way of assigning housing gain traction. The current system, which allows students to earn points for choosing their own housing through a variety of criteria, has been a controversial topic within the Marist community. Now, the school’s administration is proposing to transition to a more traditional lottery system, similar to the ones found in the majority of colleges across the country.

The priority point system is based on the concept of assigning points to students according to four categories: academic average, involvement with extra-curricular activities, disciplinary history, and residence area condition. At the end of a semester, each student is given a report where they can see the total number of points they earned. This number is what is used for determining a student’s placement in the housing process. Students with a higher number of points are more likely to get their preferred housing than those with a lower amount, as they are given an earlier time slot to apply.

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Throughout the time priority points have existed at Marist, there have always been a number of complaints from students about the system. For students like sophomore Courtney Fallon, one of the main issues they have is the commitment required to get a high number of points. “If you want to have the first spot on the housing list, you have to do everything and put so much time and effort into things like clubs,” she said. “For something like community service for example, if you don’t do it every single week you don’t get those points.”

Many students find that balancing time to do schoolwork and be actively involved in clubs is an increasingly difficult task. Fallon sees how difficult it is for students to get these points firsthand in her work as the secretary for the Social Work Association Board. “I’m in charge of assigning priority points to the members of the club, and so many of them didn’t get the points because you have to at least go to 75 percent of the meetings and events,” she said. “That’s too much and no one really has that time. If you miss one, you basically get nothing.”

In order to address student concerns, a town hall meeting hosted by Marist College President David Yellen, Student Body President Ted Dolce, and Student Government Association Vice President Ankofa Billips took place Feb. 6.

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One of the main issues touched upon surrounding the priority points system is how students from lower socio-economic backgrounds are adversely affected. Students that have to help their families or work other jobs do not have time to be involved with activities such as clubs, therefore having a negative impact on their ability to choose housing. “This is one of the main reasons why we are considering making a change to the housing system, either modifying the way priority points work or just switching to a lottery system all together,” said President Yellen. “The current system is detrimental to these groups.”

One of the proposed changes to the current system would be to remove the academic portion of priority points, putting the emphasis more on activity participation. This is because the school’s administration believes that the priority points system should be used for cultivating campus culture. However, a number of students disagree with the fact that their GPA’s should not affect their ability to get the housing they want. “You go to college to do work and further your education, not join a club,” said senior Alexandria Burnell. “If your grades are suffering because you are spending so much time participating in activities, it kind of defeats the purpose of why you’re going to school in the first place.”

On switching to a lottery system, there is a variety of opinions among students. Some, like Burnell, are in favor of implementing it. “My sister went to Quinnipiac University and they had a lottery system,” she said. “I think it’s a simpler and fairer way to assign housing, and that way you can live with whoever you want instead of being judged on how many priority points you have.”

Others though, believe that a lottery system would not be an ideal way of assigning housing. “With a lottery system you have no control over where you get to live, which is one thing I like about priority points,” said sophomore Cameryn Fontana. “Why would I put such an important part of my college life in the hands of chance like it’s a game of bingo?”

Whether the priority points system stays as is, gets substantial changes, or is removed entirely, the decision will not take effect until the beginning of the Fall 2019 semester at the earliest.

 

 

 

Redhawk Native American Arts Council Visits

images.jpgLocated in 337 of the Marist College Library, The Center for Multicultural Affairs acts as more than an office. Each day you will see a host of students entering and exiting the office as they speak with the administrative assistant, Pam, and counselors, Iris, Mary, Angel, Karen, and Terrance. But there’s more than that, there is coffee, snacks, and bonding that take places for the students which gives this place a home away from home feeling.

 

Marist CMA is more than an office but rather it is a resource. In addition to their direct support academic programs, they also provide programs and activities on campus that are open to anyone.

These events promote cultural awareness, leadership development, sustainability and even career exploration. Throughout every semester they host and co-host a series of events like the Hispanic Heritage Event, Vietnam Night, Indian Culture Awareness Night, The Global Fashion Show, and many others.

For 10 years, Marist CMA has been working to create an inclusive and welcoming community of which all students are welcome to join.

On Wednesday night, in collaboration with the Office for Accommodations and Accessibility, Student Affairs, Upward Bound, and the Diversity Council, and Human Resources, Marist CMA hosted the Red Hawk Native American Arts Council performance. The Red Hawk Native American Arts Council is a Grass-roots Not-For-Profit organization that was founded and is still maintained by natives from New York and New Jersey in 1994. Their purpose is to educate the general population about Native American heritage.

Iris Ruiz-Grech, the Director of Marist CMA said that she was excited that the event could have been rescheduled after it had to be postponed on November 15th because of the snow storm.

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Member of the Redhawk Native American Arts Council dances as Marist students and faculty watch.

Her greatest hope for this event was that students would learn about the Native American culture. The event was filled with dancing and singing as well as a wealth of information about the indigenous people.

 

 

 

“The hope is definitely awareness about the beauty and contributions of our Native Americans here in the United States,” said Ruiz-Grech. “I think it is amazing to be able to bring awareness to all of us about their importance since they were the first people in what is now called the United States.”

The council taught the attendees about the difference of tribes and also urged the audience to help their efforts by taking action.

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Cliff Matias (far right) and other members of The Redhawk Native American Arts Council

Cliff Matias is an artist, educator, photographer, hoop dancer, and actor for the Council. Matias is Kichwa and Taino. Throughout the performance, he sang, danced, and spoke to the audience.

 

When speaking about the importance of taking a stand he said that the use of Native Americans as mascots is highly offensive. He notes that universities have begun removing these mascots and so have some elementary schools although many remain resistant.

“In NYC, St. John’s University has changed their logo. So it is happening very slowly. It is only through conscious efforts and compassion and understanding of our young people, who are now moving into positions of change, we are seeing that these things are starting to take place,” said Mathias.

When pinpointing another specific change that he would like to see, he said that he believes that Columbus Day should be changed to Indigenous People’s Day.

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and countless cities have changed. I would love to see more people of color joining in this struggle for indigenous people. In America, there were so many other atrocities that [Christopher Columbus] he committed,” said Mathias. “What about the fact that he introduced the Transatlantic Slave Trade, so how come not more of our African-American brothers and sisters aren’t joining us in that struggle. So we would love to see more. Also, American young people in general coming to stand with us.”

Students who attended this event were glad that they did. Caroline Kirsten, a Marist freshmen, said that she has gone to programs in the past where Native Americans spoke about their tribes. Despite this, she said that she never heard about their current situation.

“The greatest thing I took away was an understanding of the lack of resources and the lack of awareness. I feel like that is something that should be brought up much more,” said Kirsten. Now with this new knowledge, I want to help bring awareness. If there was any action to do so, I would love to be apart of it.”

On it’s special 10 year anniversary, Marist CMA continues to host a wealth of performances and events that expose Marist students to new ideas and cultures. Be sure to check out more of their events in the near future.

 

Hughes Represents Kids of Special Olympics in NYC Marathon

Senior Caroline Hughes was making her way down the Verrazano Bridge alongside 50,000 other runners on Sun., Nov. 4, when it hit her that she was not running her usual route on the Walkway Over the Hudson, but was participating in the New York City Marathon.

Although always an athlete, Hughes picked up running in college as a way to clear her mind and destress. Only four years later, she trained for her first marathon entirely by herself, and finished in an impressive 5 hours and 47 seconds.

“Running next to complete strangers who also have a passion for running was such an unbelievable motivation,” Hughes said. “It was really, really awesome.”

Hughes first began training last summer, but it became harder to increase her mileage when she returned to Marist as the school work piled on. During mid-semester break, however, Hughes finally had time to pick up the pace, and ran 18 and a half consecutive miles, her longest distance yet. After break, she hit the gym for strength training, and, with only a few weeks to go before the big day, focused on getting enough sleep and eating properly.

Hughes’ decision to run the marathon was inspired in part by the children she works with at Windham Mountain Adaptive Sports Foundation, where she volunteers in the winter. Many of the students she teaches there are a part of Special Olympics, an organization that helps children and adults with mental and physical handicaps participate in sports. While preparing for the race, Hughes fundraised alongside 15 other runners on the Special Olympics Team, collectively raising over $70,000 for the organization.   

On that Saturday before the race, Hughes picked up her race number at the NYC Marathon Expo, where she saw runners of all different shapes and sizes, speaking a wide array of languages. The night before the race, she was sent a heartfelt video from her friends and family,  who wished her luck. She also received a letter from a Special Olympics athlete with Down Syndrome, in which he thanked her for her fundraising efforts. By 11 a.m. the next morning, the day of the race, the few fears Hughes had experienced were well out of mind, and she was ready to go.

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Hughes poses outside the NYC Marathon Expo

At the starting line, Hughes’ was greeted by the sound of Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York,” a special moment she said she will always remember. Neon signs in hand, her friends and family were scattered along the route, cheering her on. As she ran throughout the city’s five boroughs, Hughes noticed how although the crowds changed, each brought something new and exciting to the race, and every bystander, even members of the homeless, were there to support her.   

“As a runner, I was running alone, but I never felt alone,” Hughes said. “There was just so many people cheering you on, even if they didn’t know you. It was such a moving experience to see all of the different people supporting you. It really unified the entire city.”

Hughes recalled mile 21 as her most challenging, but mentally related her pace to her route back home, to remind herself that she had completed similar distances before. For further motivation, she thought of the kids of Special Olympics, who had already gotten her this far.

When she reached Central Park, she realized she was almost done; after passing her family one last time, she crossed the finish line only a few miles away, and was instantly overcome with emotion.

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Hughes finished the NYC Marathon, her first, in 5 hours and 47 seconds.

“It was just a really unbelievable feeling, to know that I had just completed a marathon,” she said.

Despite the long day, and the lingering dehydration and leg pain, Hughes returned to Marist later that night. Her own reward for the once-in-a-lifetime accomplishment? Hughes skipped her 8 a.m. the next morning, and slept in until her 11 o’clock class.

“I didn’t want to give myself too much time to rest,” she said. “I had to keep going again.”

Hughes said her favorite part of the experience was running along 1st Avenue to “Empire State of Mind,” while passing her friends and family. In the future, Hughes intends to run more marathons, but wants to race in other cities to see how their environments differ from New York’s.  

“At the end of the day, I was extremely proud of myself, because I was able to set a goal, and stick to a commitment, regardless of other things going on at the time,” Hughes said. “[Receiving letters from Special Olympic athletes] showed me that I am very blessed to run for something that is bigger than myself. It was really special, and something that I’ll never forget doing.”  

Water Polo Team Competes in Collegiate Cup

On Nov. 9, the women’s water polo team left behind the cool, crisp air of New York to enjoy a warm, sunny weekend in southern California as they competed in the annual 2018 USA Water Polo Collegiate Cup tournament.

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View from the pool at the William Woollett Aquatic Center in Irvine, Calif. Photo courtesy of Anais Mathes.

Freshmen Gabrielle Gervasi and Sawyer Alter both described playing in the “fast-paced” environment of their first Collegiate Cup as “unforgettable” and different from any other tournaments or games they played in high school.

“It was super exciting but nerve wracking, especially because we were playing University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), who is one of the top 5 teams in the nation.  We have been working really hard this season to be able to compete at the Collegiate Cup, so to have my first collegiate tournament be against top teams, while also being competitive against them, was an amazing experience,” said Gervasi.

Although playing in the tournament was stressful for Alter because she did not know what to expect from her first collegiate game, she found comfort in her teammates. “It felt like a big family trying to attain one common goal of winning.  I really liked that everyone made me feel included and everyone had their own role to play,” said Alter.

The two-day tournament took place on Nov. 10-11 at the William Woollett Aquatic Center in Irvine, Calif.  The annual event brings together the top collegiate women’s water polo teams to complete with the USA Water Polo Women’s Senior National Team.  This year, Marist was one of three East Coast teams, aside from the University of Michigan and Indiana University, who were invited to play in the tournament.

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The team gathers in a huddle before the start of a game.

When asked about the team’s dynamic while preparing for a game, Caoimhe Whitebloom, a senior on the team, described their preparation for a game as “cohesive chaos.”  In the beginning, each team member branches off to mentally prepare themselves individually by doing things such as listening to music or engaging in pre-game rituals.  Afterwards, the team eventually comes together to finish off stretching exercises and doing jumps to “hype” themselves up.  “The energy tends to get pretty intense and people bounce off each other as we get more excited,” said Whitebloom.  “We try to be as level-headed as we can and concentrate on what we are about to do beforehand.”

On the first day, Marist fell to one of the top five seeds, UCLA, 12-3, in its first game of the tournament.  That weekend, the team also faced Pomona Pitzer, San Jose State, and the University of Hawaii.  In their final game, the team competed for a second time against Pomona Pitzer for 13th place, but were outlasted 12-10.  Nevertheless, after catching a red-eye flight from Irvine on Sunday night, the team returned to campus Monday morning feeling thankful for the opportunity to participate in the tournament and excited about the prospects of the upcoming season.

“The tournament was a good kickoff to the season that starts in January because we get to see what we need to work on both individually and as a team,” said junior Anais Mathes.

Whitebloom shared a similar sentiment about the Collegiate Cup, stating that in addition to preparing them for the upcoming season, it offers the team a significant advantage.  “Most other schools don’t play a game outside of practice until second semester so [the tournament] allows us to see how well (or not) we work together,” said Whitebloom.  “We can see what we need to fix and what works.”

According to Mathes, since the team arrived back on campus, they have resumed their daily practice schedule, starting most days at 6:45 a.m. doing strength training and ending around 9 a.m. practicing specific plays and skill swimming in the pool.  After spending nearly every day together, it comes as no surprise how close the team feels with one another.

“I like how everything is very team-orientated and it makes me feel like I am a part of something bigger than myself,” said Alter.  “I want to do well for my team and my coach.”

“What I love about being apart of the Marist Water Polo team is our team dynamic. The team is so supportive in the water and on the bench which keeps the team momentum and energy really high,” said Gervasi.

Women’s soccer caps off successful season

After losing to Siena 2-0 last Wednesday, the Marist women’s soccer team wrapped up an impressive 2018 season.

According to GoRedFoxes.com, the team finished with a 9-8-2 overall record and a 7-3-1 record within the MAAC conference.  The Red Foxes made it all the way to the MAAC semifinals before getting toppled by Siena.  Their loss does not discount the team’s regular season success.  The team improved on their 2017 regular season record of 8-8-3, and Coach Leigh Howard won MAAC Coach of the Year in her first season with the team.  The team’s website points out that  Howard was the first Marist women’s soccer coach to win the award since Katherine Lyn in 2011.

The team is losing five seniors this year (Kristen Reilly, Hope Quinonez, Alexis Prisco, Tori Flaherty, and Sarah Hasselkamp), but they will have plenty of young and promising talent to  build upon for next season.  Quinonez believes that this senior class has left a positive, lasting impact on the underclassmen.

“Being a part of the Marist women’s soccer team is an honor and something they will learn to cherish as their time comes to an end,” Quinonez said. 

Coach Howard commented on the senior class’ resilience and ability to get results on GoRedFoxes.com.  “To be able to do that with a new staff, and to go through some of the turnover they’ve seen in four years speaks volumes about them as people,” Howard said. 

Quinonez shared some of the most valuable lessons that soccer has taught her over her 18-year career.   “I think the most important lesson it has taught me has been to never take anything for granted and enjoy every single second you get to be on that field,” Quinonez said.  Quinonez was sidelined for half of the season with an ACL injury, but she is still tremendously grateful for the opportunities that soccer has given her and the success that the team has experienced this past season. 

Quinonez also commented on some of her favorite moments from this past season.  Specifically, she mentioned her game-tying goal against Yale.  “There is no better feeling than scoring a goal and lifting your team up when they need it most,” Quinonez said.

The end of the season is, by nature, a reflective time for players.  It is an especially nostalgic time for seniors.  For most of them, it will be their last time playing soccer competitively.

“Might be cliche, but all good things come to an end,” Quinonez said.  “I would not change my four years as a Red Fox because my time has shaped me into the person I am today, and has prepared me to face anything that comes my way in the future.”

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Source: GoRedFoxes.com

Best Buddies Host “Superhero” Event

Laughter and chatter filled the room at Marist on Sunday as Batman and Superman faces piled up on the table as part of the Best Buddies event. 

Best Buddies Marist hosted their superhero event where Marist students and their buddies could do a series of superhero-themed arts and crafts.

Best Buddies is the world’s largest organization that is dedicated to ending the social, physical, and economic isolation of over 200 million people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Best Buddies Marist is one of 2,500 chapters worldwide that exist within this organization.

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Pictured: Best Buddies Superhero Event

 

There was an overwhelming sense of community and friendship in Student Center Room 3104 on Sunday afternoon, as the students helped their buddies complete their activities so that they could be awarded with their certificate of completion.

 Marist students and buddies worked together to complete the crafts. These crafts included making a superhero symbol on a plate, making superhero masks, making wooden superheroes, and others. made as part of the Best Buddies Marist event.

The club works with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The buddies are from the community and they are paired with Marist college students. The bond that is formed is unbreakable.

According to Melissa Fletcher, the Vice President of Best Buddies Marist, many students remain in contact with their buddies after graduation. She recalls that there are numerous members of the Class of 2018 who are now graduate students who still come back to the monthly events to see their old buddies.

Each month Best Buddies Marist hosts an event. In addition to this, they do events on campus to raise awareness and fundraise for the international Best Buddies organization.

Secretary of Best Buddies Marist, Bianca Gibbons-Morales, describes it as “a nice break in the flow of college to help other people.”

“The purpose of this club is to build these relationships and friendships between people with disabilities and the college students on campus. It’s mostly to get them aware of each other and to build friendships,” said Fletcher.

There are over 40 students who are a part of Best Buddies Marist. Of those interviewed, each described the club as one that is unlike any other.

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Pictured: Jon Newfield and Dave Wallace and their buddy, Joe

“The people that come to this event are just some of the best people in the world. They really bring positivity into your life, so it is really a great thing to do,” said new member and senior, Jon Newfield, “There’s a wholesome feeling that you get. It’s a great thing to do.”

“When you come into this club, it is just a happy environment. Everyone in here is always having fun, playing games, and being happy. Other clubs it’s more you do informational things, it’s not really interactions with people. This is very interactive,” said Fletcher.

Best Buddies Marist leaves a lasting impact on all parties involved.

 

“These events brighten my day because it is truly heartwarming to see the positive impact I have on a buddy by simply setting aside a part of my day to spend time with them,” said freshman, Caroline O’Handley.

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Pictured: Caroline O’Handley, Marist freshman, with her wooden superheroes

Composting 101: Bananas and Buckets

Every morning, the smell of coffee fills Tess Cimino’s apartment, marking the beginning of her daily routine. The senior removes the coffee grounds from the machine and puts them into her compost bucket: a small container in her freezer full of organic food scraps such as banana peels, egg shells, and apple cores. 

Cimino first began composting while participating in the Marist in Manhattan program in the spring of her junior year. She kept a compost bucket in her freezer then brought it to a local farmer’s market each Sunday. “My mom thought I was crazy keeping my trash in my freezer,” chuckled Cimino. 

Over the summer both Cimino and fellow senior Aaron Tod were visiting other college campuses that had composting stations, which inspired them to bring the practice to Marist. “It’s so  interesting to think about how we can give new life to our old waste,” mused Cimino. “It’s an ongoing evolutionary process.”

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Senior Tess Cimino holds her compost bucket.

Since returning to campus for their senior year, Cimino and Tod have begun creating a composting pilot program. The pilot will first focus on the Foy Townhouses, where students will be given a few three gallon buckets to collect food scraps suitable for composting. 

Once the buckets are full students will bring them to the dumpster with their normal trash, and the grounds department will collect it. When the compost becomes soil, it will be used on campus.

“Our ultimate goal is to have a widespread composting program that’s in sync with  Marist’s values and sustainability plan,” said Tod. 

While some students may already compost at home, the method of composting Cimino and Tod are proposing is different according to Richard Feldman, Associate Professor of Environmental Science. “It starts with a feeder material that stimulates the growth of yeast and fungi, and it’s anaerobic, meaning it doesn’t use oxygen,” Feldman explained. 

Students will be given this agent, called Bokashi, to combine with their food scraps. Bokashi ferments the food scraps and reduces methane, the gas responsible for foul odors, making it suitable for indoor composting. 

The choice to give students Bokashi was a purposeful one. A compost with Bokashi, “Will take meat, dairy, and even bones, which is a benefit because it further simplifies the process for students” said Feldman. 

Tod added, “The type of composting we’re trying isn’t necessarily the fastest way, but it will be the easiest for students to adopt.” 

The next step for Cimino and Tod is educating and gaining support from students. To do this Cimino and Tod plan to host workshops to teach students how to compost. “At this point it’s mostly about getting students to be aware of the waste they’re creating,” commented Cimino. 

The biggest challenge the two seniors face is ensuring their composting program continues after they graduate in May. Steve Sansola, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, revealed a few students began a composting pilot three years ago with the Upper Fulton residences, however it didn’t last due to a lack of interest. “We have everything in place, we just need enough student interest and commitment,” said Sansola.

If students who don’t live in Foy want to participate in the pilot, Cimino recommended they collect food scraps in their freezers then dispose of them in the receptacles that will be located next to the dumpsters in the Foy parking lot. “When it comes down to it, composting is so simple,” said Cimino. “It’s just one extra bin but it can make a big difference.” 

Students Stay Up ‘Til Dawn for a Cause

While most college students were out partying or hanging with friends, on Sat., Nov. 11, Marist students traded in a night of sleep to participate in the 12th annual Up ‘Til Dawn event, which raises money for the pediatric cancer patients of St. Jude Children’s Hospital. 

Located in Memphis, TN, St. Jude’s is one of the world’s premier pediatric cancer and treatment centers. With the help of the donations it receives through events like Up ‘Til Dawn, St. Jude’s covers the treatment, travel, housing and food expenses for all of the roughly 7,500 patients it treats each year. 

This year’s Up ‘Til Dawn Executive Director, Casey Jaeb, cannot remember a time when St. Jude Children’s Hospital was not a part of her life. She made her first donation- the contents of her piggy bank- at the age of six, and in high school organized a night-long zumbathon event, the proceeds of which went directly to the children’s hospital.

Now, as a college senior, Jaeb led the organization’s efforts to ensure its participants were fulfilling their fundraising potential, and would all make it to sunrise on Sun., Nov. 12.

“I don’t know about anybody else, but this moves me,” Jaeb gushed. “To see college students give up a night when they could be going out or doing other things with their friends, and [instead] giving their night to raise awareness about St. Jude’s, is amazing.”

The event kicked off at 11 p.m. with interactive games in the student center, followed by a karaoke session in the cabaret. In between activities, students watched video montages of St. Jude patients and their stories, and took photos at the decorated backdrop. Food and refreshments were provided throughout the night to keep the participants well fueled.

Jaeb explained how the event’s brainstorming process usually starts in April, while the actual planning begins about three weeks into the start of the new school year. Although a portion of the funds for the event are provided by Marist’s Student Government Association and St. Jude’s, some of the expenses come directly out of the board member’s pockets.  

While students who participated were encouraged to fundraise at least $100, many went above and beyond that goal, with some raising over $1000 each. For those who struggled to fundraise, however, the St. Jude executive board hosted several events and donation challenges throughout the semester to give students a head start, including the “Halloween No-More-Cancer-Rally,” which took place on Oct. 24.  

Sophomore student Alexa Fisher participated in the event with her sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma. The fundraiser struck a personal chord in Fisher, who has several family members affected by cancer.   

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The members of Kappa Kappa Gamma participated in this year’s Up ‘Til Dawn

“[Living] in the college bubble, you often times don’t think about anything but yourself and your problems,” Fisher said. “So [realizing] that there’s other people that are struggling more than you but are powering through, shows that you can power through too.”

Similar sentiments inspired Ava Hanlon to become involved in Up ‘Til Dawn during her freshman year, when a close family friend’s 11-year-old daughter was diagnosed with an aggressive form of Leukemia.

“My passion [for Up ‘Til Dawn] comes from the hope and spirit these children have to fight this disease everyday,” Hanlon, a junior, said. “To me, it is my job to to help in any way I can, to one day see these children home and healthy again, cancer free.”

According to the St. Jude website, approximately 75 percent of the hospital’s budgeted costs are covered by public contributions. Since its conception more than 50 years ago, St. Jude’s has helped increase the childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent in 1962 to 80 percent in 2018.

“St. Jude is one of the greatest charities in the world,” Jaeb said. “They provide treatment for kids with life threatening illnesses at no charge to the families, and on top of that they do top-of-the-line research that they share with every hospital and every doctor around the world who wants access to it. St. Jude is just amazing.” 

Enthusiasm was still high among the participants as the night neared dawn, and reached a crescendo when, at 5 a.m., the executive board members gathered on the third floor of the Rotunda to reveal the total amount fundraised: $61,567 of their initial $65,000 goal.

This year marks the first time Marist’s chapter of Up ‘Til Dawn fundraised over $60,000. Since the event, the total has climbed to $62, 342, and continues to grow even now.

“The outcome of the event is one thing, but the fundraising we were able to achieve is astounding,” Hanlon said. “That one night of sleep is incomparable to the sleep parents and children lose when battling cancer, so every ounce of me is beaming with pride of how incredible the turnout was.”