Hudson River Housing Continues Commitment to Revitalizing Local Area

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. — Nestled on Mill Street is an antiquated house with new purpose. Hudson River Housing, a local non-profit organization, resides here. This incorporation “improves lives and communities through housing with compassion and development with vision,” according to their website. With the group’s unwavering dedication to bettering the Poughkeepsie area and helping the community reach its full potential through not only housing but also programming, this organization does not receive a fraction of the recognition it deserves for the meaningful work it does.   Continue reading

Advertisements

Kingston Stockade Look to Implement Promotion and Relegation

The Kingston Stockade, a lower league soccer team based in Kingston, have been making waves in the world of soccer after writing a letter to the United States Soccer Federation regarding the implementation of promotion and relegation into the US Soccer pyramid. If the request is denied by US Soccer, owner and chairman Dennis Crowley says that he will file a lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation.

The United States of America’s soccer league system is one of the few in the world that do not use the system of promotion and relegation. The concept is simple. The worst three teams in the top division are dropped down a step on the league pyramid, and the best three teams from the league underneath on the pyramid. Take England for example. In the English Premier League last season, the three worst teams were Sunderland, Hull, and Middlesbrough. These three teams were sent down to the second division (Football League Championship) and replaced by the three best teams from the second division last year, in this case being Huddersfield, Brighton, and Newcastle. Every year, the Premier League has three new teams replacing the ones relegated the year before, while all other lower leagues have six new ones, as three teams are promoted to the league above and three are relegated to the league below in every other league.

Setting up promotion and relegation allows players to showcase their talents at a higher level. In the current setup in the United States, players can be stuck in the lower divisions for their entire careers, never getting the chance to play at a more elite level, and some truly talented players have fallen through the cracks. Others believe that promotion and relegation would allow more teams to get more money to pump into youth soccer academies, which would raise the future talent level in the USA. This would likely raise the credibility of U.S. soccer in the eyes of the rest of the world, which view the American National Team as underachievers after failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

Promotion and relegation also allows teams to participate at a higher level, giving them a better chance to make money. In every country, including the US, the top league gets the lion’s share of the revenue from ticket sales, media rights, and publicity. What Crowley argues is that the teams in Major League Soccer are using the league and its exclusivity as a form of monopoly over the market of soccer in the United States. He argues that promotion and relegation create more of a meritocracy, which is one of the fundamental aspects of capitalism. Most teams in the United States’ second division, the North American Soccer League, most likely wouldn’t beat the big guns in the MLS, but they might be. For instance, Leicester City was promoted to the English Premier League in 2014 after winning the second division. After a middle of the road 2014-15 season that saw them narrowly escape relegation, they would go on to win the league title at 5,000 to 1 odds in 2015-16. They were also able to build elite level youth training programs with the revenue that they brought in from the Premier League.

However, promotion and relegation in the United States doesn’t come without problems, and it has been met by critics both on and off the field. “I think promotion and relegation is a strong solution to bringing more attention to the game in this county, but I don’t think it’s the best solution to developing into a bigger soccer nation” said Ernest Mitchell, a defender on the Kingston Stockade last season.

One of the major problems of promoting smaller teams into bigger leagues is the problem with finances. While rich owners like Crowley can afford to move his team up to a higher league, many other teams cannot. “There are not enough teams, and there’s not enough money in US Soccer,” said Enzo Petrocelli, a midfielder who has spent time playing soccer in both the United States and Italy. Lower leagues on the soccer pyramid are broken up into regional conference so that the travel costs for the teams is kept to as low as possible. If a team from a regionalized league, like the Stockade, gets promoted to the NASL, which is a nationwide league, the team’s travel costs would increase exponentially. Rather than Kingston traveling by bus to close locations like Brooklyn or Portsmouth, N.H., they would instead be traveling cross-country to Phoenix and Las Vegas, which would require airfare. Not many teams would be able to afford that, especially in the first season in the new league.

Whether or not promotion and relegation should be implemented in the United States soccer leagues is one of the most hot-button issues in soccer. Supporters of promotion and relegation will often cite the Leicester City story, while detractors echo the sentiments of Petrocelli and Mitchell. Either way, a good majority of diehard fans of US soccer have a strong opinion on the matter.

Free College Paving New Path For Collegiate New Yorkers

img-0800-1.jpg

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. — The 36th president of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, was quoted in a 1963 speech at the University of Michigan as saying, “Poverty must not be a bar to learning, and learning should offer an escape from poverty.” Those words certainly held true for Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-NY). Cuomo has now put into place a play to make Johnson’s quote a reality in the State and City University of New York systems. Continue reading

Quiet Cove Closed For Construction

Poughkeepsie, NY — Quiet Cove Riverfront Park is located on the west side of Route 9 in the Town of Poughkeepsie, just past the north entrance of the Marist College campus. The park used to only be available to Hudson River psychiatric center residents, until Duchess County purchased it. Now open to the public, the park’s proximity to Marist College’s campus is what makes it a desired destination for Marist students. Students can go to the park to walk the trails, have lunch, fish, or just hang out by the water of the Hudson River. Continue reading

Vegas Strong

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.— An unexpected casualty struck in Las Vegas, Nevada, on the night of Oct. 1, 2017.

Concertgoers were fearful of their lives that night as hundreds were left staggering about the venue trying to flee the scene as quickly as possible without getting shot. Individuals were being taken randomly in vehicles and many were separated from family and friends by the end of the night. The only sounds that were heard while this horrific tragedy ensued were the sounds of the individuals crying for desperate help.

Stephen Paddock, 64, maliciously fired hundreds of rifle shots from a hotel room in the Mandalay Bay Casino towards patrons at the Route 91 Harvest music festival, killing 58 people and leaving 546 injured. This unthinkable tragedy is the deadliest mass shooting committed by an individual in the United States.

Continue reading

Marist Healing, Questioning After Vegas Shooting

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.—Marist College sits 2,549 miles away from Las Vegas, Nevada. That’s approximately a 38 hour ride drive. Yet, on the morning of October 2nd, the aftershocks from what had transpired the night before had rippled into the Marist community. The wounds caused by what can only be described as a senseless act of unprecedented violence were so fresh at Marist it felt as though it had happened in the area.

Stephen Paddock was responsible for the murder of 58 concert goers at a country music festival, with 546 additional injuries being reported. Like many Marist students, junior Dylan Reilly woke up to a mixture of shock and disbelief. “More than anything, I was just stunned,” said Reilly. “I sat on my bed for probably an hour just refreshing Twitter. I just couldn’t believe something like this happened.”

Continue reading

Illnesses on College Campuses

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y — Syracuse University has an outbreak of mumps cases on campus, which started back in late September. In early October, a message was sent out to the campus saying that the number had risen from two to eight. However, by mid-October, the numbers had increased to 24 confirmed and 26 probable cases of mumps. (Update: as of Nov. 17, there were 42 confirmed and 79 probable cases.) Continue reading

Poughkeepsie McDonald’s Involved in Szechaun Sauce Blunder

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. —Many of McDonald’s approximate 68 million daily customers are now very angry with the fast food giant.

On Saturday, Oct. 7, the McDonalds located on 733 Main St. in Poughkeepsie joined several other locations in the company’s attempt to bring back a rare dipping sauce known as Szechuan sauce. The sauce was only made in 1998 to promote the Disney film Mulan, but was recently referenced in the hit Adult Swim television show Rick and Morty. The third and most recent season of Rick and Morty was the most-watched in Adult Swim history, and many of its fans called for McDonalds to bring back their old dipping sauce. As a result, McDonalds announced it would bring back the sauce for one day, but the promotion did not go as planned.

Continue reading

The Ups and Downs of College Internships

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. –“There is nothing in the world like being on the sideline of an NFL game or being able to casually ask any player what their favorite Netflix show is. Just the other day I got to meet “Taysteé” [Danielle Brooks] from “Orange is the New Black” and I got hit with a ball thrown by Tom Brady—and that’s just a normal game day” said Marist College junior Michaela Landry. Continue reading