Marist students face real scare on Halloween

There was a carbon monoxide scare in Building A (also known as “New Gartland” to some) on Monday, October 31st. Though this may have frightened some people more than any clown running amuck, nobody was harmed, and the premises was safe and secure later that same day. Students were evacuated from their rooms at approximately 10:20 in the morning and although students had no idea when they would be allowed back in at the beginning of the evacuation, the process to secure the building took about four and a half hours and students were welcomed back into the building in between 2:20 and 3:00 in the afternoon depending on who you asked. Continue reading

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The importance of dieting to Marist athletes

Marist College has over 20 varsity sports teams on campus along with several club teams as well. With the variety of sports that Marist has to offer, there seems to be a difference in how each team handles their diet to stay in shape for their specific sport. Players from several Marist sports gave their insight and experience with dieting on their respective Marist team and how they may differ from those of other teams.

Members from Marist baseball team, club hockey team, and women’s swimming and diving team have strong opinions about how athletes should handle their dieting methods if they want to be healthy and in shape for their team. Continue reading

Why students and student-athletes are turning away from gatorade

PepsiCo. Inc, the maker of Gatorade decided to go organic with the release of their new version of all-natural sports drinks, G Organic, this past September because they feel many amateur athletes are swaying more to the organic side rather than the sugary side when it comes to sports drinks. PepsiCo Inc. stated that G Organic will consist of seven ingredients: water, organic cane sugar, citric acid, organic natural flavor, sea salt, sodium citrate and potassium chloride and nothing else. G Organic, however, still has the above normal amount of sugar, across Marist, student-athletes and students input their view and choices of drinking a sports beverage or just water before competition or exercise.

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The senior 15 is the new freshman 15

Senior year, as in the last year of undergraduate college is a time to never forget. From turning 21, to having real world internships and job offers, there is an array of differing life changes that go on for each individual. What seems to be a common trend throughout most seniors however are the bodily changes that occur without being desired.

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Are those bruises?

After the 2016 Summer Olympics, Michael Phelps had yet again collected an incredible amount of gold medals. However, during the games instead of asking how is race went, reporters were asking why was he covered in bruises? The answer is called ‘cupping therapy.’ Cupping therapy is an ancient form of alternative medicine that is commonly found in traditional Chinese Medicine. This therapy includes special cups that suction on your skin for a few minutes. This heated-suction helps with pain, inflammation, blood flow, and relaxation. These cups stay in the same place anytime from five to fifteen minutes in order to draw blood to the area, allowing the overworked muscles to heal quicker.

According to the research coordinator at the New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Anna Colacino explains cupping can be very helpful for athletes. “Athletes tend to overuse their bodies which can create tight muscles and spasms. Cupping can help reduce these issues because it works deeper by loosening muscles, deep tissue release and increase in circulation.”

As Michael Phelps and the US Olympic team spiked the conversation about cupping therapy, it seems to have taken the athletic training world by storm with other Olympic, professional and collegiate athletes. This interesting new therapy has even been brought to Marist through our athletic training facilities.

Marist Lacrosse player Frank Brier reacts to his first cupping experience this fall, “I had a few buddies of mine try it after they were very sore from a hard lift and they had great success so I decided to give it a try. Honestly it felt amazing, I felt as if I had more movement after a work out than I ever had before.”

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Swimmer prepares for practice after getting Cupping therapy

Marist College Coordinator of Sports Medicine, Jeffery Carter explains that after the 2016 Olympics everyone was talking about cupping and he decided to do some research. “I reached out to a friend of mine at Michigan University training facility for some more information about cupping. He explained all the benefits and that student-athletes have responded very positively to the new-found magic cups.”

All the Athletic trainers and athletic training students have been trained to perform cupping therapy because it has become such a high demand, especially with the Marist swimming team.

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Newly renovated Office of Accommodations and Accessibility offers aid to physically disabled

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The newly renovated Office of Accommodations and Accessibility. Photo by Andrew Auger

In coordination with Marist College’s celebration of Disability Awareness Week, the newly renovated Office of Accommodations and Accessibility officially opened its doors for the first time this past Thursday. The opening follows a week of lectures and hands-on demonstrations meant to educate the campus on physical and learning disabilities.

“The goal of this week was to not only get people familiar with our offices, but to see if we could put them in the shoes of someone with a disability and help them understand what that person goes through,” said Assistant Dean of Student Life and Development Patricia Cordner.

Formerly known as Special Services, the workplace makeover in Donnelly Hall gives the program a new exterior look. The accommodating functionality of the office towards people with physical disabilities, however, is nothing new.

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Athletic Teams, Little Equipment, Large Crowds Send Students to Mike Arteaga’s

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Mike Arteaga’s Health & Fitness Center located on North Road directly across from the McCann gym.

Included in the Marist tuition is free access to the McCann gym on campus; however, many Marist students choose to pay to use Mike Arteaga’s Health and Fitness Center across the street to avoid the inconveniences of the McCann gym.

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Student EMT service being pitched to Marist administration

Marist College could soon have a new task force to answer the call.

A group of Marist students, headed by senior Tyler Robinson, are looking to formulate a student-run Emergency Medical Service group based on campus. The group would consist of student volunteers with Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) licenses or official Basic Life Support training.

Robinson has toiled with this concept for two years and is finally working to make it happen before his graduation. His plan began simply, recruiting interested students on Facebook and creating a private group, now 22 members strong. Now it appears to be gaining traction, as talks between the group and Marist Administration have been ongoing for several weeks.

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Hitting through the heat

Despite the summer season coming to an end next week, it doesn’t seem like Mother Nature seems to care that in Poughkeepsie, NY, September 21 is the beginning oft he fall season. Changing leaf colors, cooler temperatures, pumpkin picking and all the other wonderful Hudson Valley perks occur during this time of the year. At Marist College, September is not usually as hot as the other summer month of the year, but students and staff and community members continue to prepare their days for nearly 90-degree weather and severe humidity.

For the tennis team at Marist College this means staying hydrated, keeping the rally of the tennis ball going and somewhat faking it until they make it to the end of practice. Or at least that’s what the coaches think they are doing to battle the unexpected heat during the third week of college. On such a hot day (nearly 15-degrees above average temperatures) for this time of year, the coaching staff had some tips to playing smart in such conditions. “Preparing before the day, hydrating in the morning before practice is necessary for a successful day,” said head coach Tim Smith. By the time players reach practice they need to have already been drinking water to battle the heat and sun. While the head coach worries about hydration the assistant coach Ron Lane discussed “making sure players take breaks ever 20-30 minutes after intense work outs.”Quick breaks throughout the practices can ensure that no one gets exhausted and keep seach session efficient enough to complete without any serious injuries.

Marist’s football team struggles to deal with scorching heat

Some of the team poses between afternoon practice, where temperatures reached the high 90s.

Some of the team poses with Coach Poveromo between afternoon practice, with temperatures reaching the high 90s.

With sizzling hot temperatures rolling into the early days of September, the Marist College Football team continues to be challenged by the scorching heat and high humidity. The team confesses that this late August’s preseason was their hardest yet, from the intensity of their practices, to the unbearable, sleepless nights in Champagnat Hall. But due to climate change, there has been a culture change taking over college football, this especially hot season. The sport’s tradition of having multiple practices a day for conditioning purposes, is becoming a questionable practice.

According to the NCAA, recent years have marked an increase in player injury and death due to heat-related causes, and as a result, “two-a-day” practices are becoming an antiquated ideal for collegiate football teams. To address heat concerns, in 2003 the NCAA  prohibited two-a-days on consecutive days and during the first five days of practice. But despite this fact, this year members of Marist’s team experienced first-hand some of the dangerous effects of multiple practices a day in the grueling heat.
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