Student-Athlete: Easier On or Off the Field?

Don’t be afraid to ask if you have questions- coaches, CSAE, professors, anyone they are more than willing to help you figure things out and make sure you can succeed,” says Beatrix Bradford, a member of the Marist College Women’s Rowing Team, when asked what advice she would give to prospective student-athletes.

According to NCAA.org, there are more than 460,000 student-athletes this academic year across the nation which is a record high number.  

So what is the reason for so many students participating in athletics?  Some may say it’s for the scholarship opportunities.

“More than 50% of parents push their children to compete at the collegiate level…because there is potential for money off the tuition price,” says Daniel Stevens, Athletic Trainer at Performax Physical Therapy.

According to marist.edu, Marist College sponsors NCAA Scholarships for 21 of Marist’s 23 men’s and women’s Division I programs.  

However, many student athletes say that it can be overwhelming being on both a sports team and being a college student.

At Marist College, most athletes, when in season, can have practice as early as 6 a.m. meaning they have to arrive at least by 5:50 a.m.  The early waking calls for an early night to bed, but due to homework and other projects, sometimes that can be hard to do.

“We practice for 3 hours everyday and that doesn’t even include lift, team meetings, film, and prehab/posthab. Not only is playing a sport physically exhausting it’s also mentally exhausting but we’re still expected to perform at the highest level in the classroom regardless of that,” says Stephanie Stone, Marist Women’s Volleyball.

So the stress of high performance on and off the court is inevitable.

Athletes don’t necessarily have to be roommates with other athletes but there are pros and cons to doing so.  A popular comment made by many athletes is that a pro to living together is you have the same morning and night routine such as when you wake up and when you go to bed.  Because of this, there is less worry of waking up your roommates and making them agitated.

But some athletes also say it’s good to have more than one friend group.  “I would tell a future athlete to make friends outside of the team. You’re with your teammates everyday and although it’s important to get along well with your teammates it’s also important to get that separation. A lot of times what happens/the emotions in practice or in a game get carried off the court,” says Stone.

“If anything, sports has helped me create a plan and stick with it which has been very helpful,” says Bradford.

 

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Study Abroad: “Complex but Worth it”

Colleges and Universities across the globe offer numerous study abroad programs and even encourage this form of study.

“I think it is important for young adults to get out and see the world.  So many of us are stuck in a little bubble without even realizing it,” said Maya Guzman, Marist College Junior.

Colleges and Universities aren’t the only types of schools that offer overseas programs.  Many high schools offer the opportunity as well through a certain Rotary club.

“I was so young when I decided to leave my home for a year to study in Brazil.  I had barely just turned 16 years old and I walked onto a plane knowing I wouldn’t be home for a year; it was the most surreal moment of my life.” said Christina Schumchyk, Stony Brook University Junior.  “I just knew there was more to see. I come from such a small town and I felt so isolated, I knew I needed to get free and explore,” continued Schumchyk.

According to research conducted by NAFSA, roughly 325,339 U.S. students studied abroad for college credit in 2016.  The enrollment increased by 3.8 percent from the previous year.

https://www.nafsa.org/Policy_and_Advocacy/Policy_Resources/Policy_Trends_and_Data/Trends_in_U_S__Study_Abroad/

The Power of International Education organization conducted research that concludes more women than men study abroad each year with an approximate 70 to 30 ratio.  There is also a higher number of undergraduate students going abroad compared to graduate students with a rough 90 to 10 ratio.

https://www.iie.org/Research-and-Insights/Open-Doors/Data/US-Study-Abroad/Student-Profile

So where are these students going?  The U.S. Study Abroad Data from the 2017 Open Doors Report claims about 12% of students choose to study in the United Kingdom, nearly 11% in Italy, and 9% in Spain.

“Going to London was important to me because it seemed to be the most centralized destination.  I figured from there I had pretty easy access to every other country and city I wanted to visit, which is exactly what I did,” said Erin Greco, Siena College Graduate.  

“I would do it all over again and I am a huge advocate for current students going abroad.  There is nothing like it.” said Greco.

Rachel Thayer, a Junior at Marist College, described the process of going abroad “complicated but worth it.”  “There is just so much that goes into it and so much I didn’t fully understand. So many government documents are needed and you really have to take everything into consideration.  I mean you are leaving your home country for a full semester.” said Thayer.

Thayer expressed that the process shouldn’t discourage students from traveling and studying abroad.

“Once you are here, once you sit in a class, once you are eating your first meal, it all just falls into place.  You take a sigh of relief and just feel grateful for the opportunity.” continued Thayer.

Marist College Welcomes Home Former Red Foxes

Poughkeepsie, New York- The Marist College Campus Green was filled with people of all ages smiling, laughing, and catching up on Saturday, October 20th during an Alumni Weekend event.

 

Past Red Foxes filled the campus exploring the new buildings, talking with old professors, and sharing their favorite college memories with current students.  Every year Marist hosts an Alumni Weekend/Homecoming that welcomes back all graduates of Marist. Events that are held include a football game, barbecue, food and beverage vendors, class pictures, and much more.  

 

Current students were reminded about many changes; one being that Marist was once an all male school, as the last class of that era walked around with green baseball caps to show off which class they were.  

 

Many alum were excited to network with current students and offer advice and tips for their future.  Kelsey Donohue ‘13 offered advice from her own personal experience. Donohue spent a semester in Washington D.C. at American University through the semester program Marist offers.  Although skeptical about the possible outcomes of her semester away, she was thankful she accepted the opportunity and was overwhelmed with joy due to her achievements. “Take every opportunity Marist has to offer.  Apply for things out of reach even if they seem like a stretch. You are capable of making that reach and succeeding,” said Donohue.

 

So what exactly has changed at Marist?  Tom Spratt ‘68 said, “Donnelly Hall was our cafeteria.  There was also a bar in the basement of Champagnat Hall which is where I worked.” Many Alum stopped in the admissions office and reminisced about the time it was a dorm.   Some even mentioned Donnelly Hall was once where mixers with Mount Saint Mary College students were held. The boys would dress up in their best clothes and head to the Brown Derby on Friday nights; much different from the current Friday night outings most Marist students take part in.

 

Some Alum are also parents to current and prospective Red Foxes.  “Marist is a family place. It’s more than a community, it’s a family” said Grace Ritter ‘18, looking at her dad John Ritter ‘84, catching up with old classmates.  It is not rare for families to be filled with past, present, and future Red Foxes. The Marist instagram page is constantly filled with pictures of baby Red Foxes.

 

Current students were eager to hear from their friends who had just graduated.  They wanted to know what the “real world” and graduate school was like. They were all relieved to hear that the graduates were enjoying their jobs, new cities and homes, and the friends they had made.  It also gave them a sense of reassurance which was highly needed after midterms week which was the week before. Many recent alum expressed their excitement for their new lives but also sorely missed their time on campus.

 

Many students also were interested in networking and speaking with older alum.  They had their resumes ready incase an internship opportunity appeared. William Clooman ‘68 shared his story of being the first President of the Alum Association Search Committee and worked on the board when former President Murray was hired.

 

Alum were excited to post their pictures on social media and share their annual Red Fox memories with the rest of the world.  Captions of posts included “the boys are back in town,” “Marist forever and ever,” and “always and forever a red fox.”

 

Current students strolled around campus smiling at how happy all the alum seemed to be.  “It comforts me knowing that even after we graduate, we will still be just as excited to be here on campus.  Marist is more than a college, it’s our home,” said Lindsay Barton ‘20.

Enrollment Changes Causes Admissions to Work Harder

Poughkeepsie, New York- Enrollment at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York has varied greatly; causing a quick response in the Admissions office to ensure the revenue does not change and to keep the institution in good financial standing.

Applications for admission to universities and colleges nationwide has increased the past few years but the yield, or the amount of students who actually attend the institutions, has gone down.  “There are many reasons as to why this is happening,” says Nicole Radasso, Associate Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Marist College. “We have noticed that prospective students are panicking and applying to more schools to ensure they have more options.  They are keeping financials in mind more so now than ever before also,” said Radasso. The student demographic at Marist College is made up of 46 states and 65 countries.

Marist College has increased their acceptance rate throughout the years to try and match the same number of students enrolled in the freshman class each year.  Although the acceptance rate now stands at 45% it is still fairly below the national acceptance average which stands at 68%, making the institution a “selective school.”  Roughly 11,000 students apply to Marist College each year and around 1,300 will be accepted with a slightly lower number actually enrolling.

So what else is Marist College doing to protect the enrollment?  “We’re doing well, we are looking into the future for different programs, and we are doing everything we can to enhance our undergraduate program,” says Radasso.  The college has met their projected enrollment number each year and that is what is needed to “keep the business running,” according to Radasso. Enhancing the graduate programs, the amount of scholarships the institution can offer,  and increasing the amount of programs offered are just a few ways the school is working to keep the revenue at the right rate.

Junior, Emily Marold, said, “although I now have more knowledge about tuition and the debt it can put you in, I still would never regret my decision to attend Marist.  It’s costly, but it’s for a good reason. It just motivate me to look for more scholarships and be a better student to obtain the academic scholarships.”