Marist emergency resources for students

Collectively as Marist students we have all seen accidents happen. Whether it be too much to drink on the weekends, a trip down the stairs, or even athletic injuries, not everyone knows how to properly handle an emergency situation. With services such as Marist security, and SNAP, a student run security system, Marist has a lot of options to help students in need that they may not be aware of. In addition to the ones students are not aware of is the question of whether some that many have witnessed work properly.

Marist Office of Security

Marist Office of Security

Katie Weinstein, a Marist senior, explained the amount of accidents she has seen since freshman year. She said “just alcohol related accidents alone I have seen at least 10 people be taken away in ambulances in just my freshman year dorm alone.” What Weinstein is referring to is the strict system that Marist has in place for students who are caught intoxicated in the dorms. The systems states that students caught under the influence of alcohol, or with a failure to swipe into freshman doors will be escorted to the hospital by ambulance. Weinstein further explained “I think consequences of reporting a situation, or being caught in one prevent students from reaching out and seeking support and help from these recourses”.

Ms. Weinstein’s concern coincides with many other students who feel that the Marist drinking policy is too strict and actually ends up allowing for more unsafe behavior. Kelsey Zappora, a student at Marist said “I lived in Champagne my freshman year, and I saw students sleeping outside just to avoid swiping in and possibly failing the three swipe rule”. Ms. Zappora observed that the fear of getting caught seems to overpower the potentially like threatening situations students get themselves in regarding alcohol.

What many students do not realize is that the rigid rules Marist puts in place are not to punish you but to ensure the safety of all students to the furthest degree. Katelyn Boylan an RA in Midrise said “As an RA we take hospital visits, very seriously. During RA Training we learn how to deal with the situation and how to contact security, when a situation like this happens. It scary at times to deal with but we work to the best of our abilities to make sure that our residents are safe and given the best care necessary.” Boylan along with many other RA’s reveal that the strictness is necessary not only for the safety of students but also for the reputation of the school, and the liability that many RA’s might face if they do not take proper precautions.

In addition to handling emergency situations with alcohol Marist has many services and policies that do not get negative reputations from students. One of these services you should be aware of is SNAP. SNAP stands for student nighttime auxiliary patrol, and there goal is to work as an escort service for students. The Marist security policy page explains “SNAP was designed to provide the Marist Community with a safe means to travel around the campus at night. The SNAP employees who complete the escorts are students employed by the Office of Safety and Security.” Tom D’Antonio, a SNAP employee said “We make our rounds on campus to allow for students to use the escorts and give general safe presence. We radio in anything that could be presumed dangerous, and it is important that we immediately contact security if anything dangerous comes up”. D’Antonio along with other SNAP employees work the make the campus safer for students during the nighttime, a service that not all students are aware of.

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           Marist Safety Call Box

Maddie Casalino, a freshman at Marist said “I had no idea about this service, it is honestly extremely comforting to know that I have a safe way to get to get to my dorm when it gets dark and I am alone. Just knowing it is an option is a relief.” In addition to SNAP students also have the option of hitting the emergency buttons that are located through the campus on many of the lamp posts. Both of these services work to ensure student’s safety after the sun goes down.

In addition to nighttime safety, Marist athletics have emergency preparation systems set in place for accidents. At many of the sports games students witness ambulances standing by in case of an emergency situation, alone with proper athletic training students go through in order to avoid injury. The combination of these two work to ensure that any student athlete can be treated on the spot for injury, or emergency care. In addition trainers for each sport are fully trained on how to handle emergency situations and learn how to act fast if needed. Demetrius Williams, a Football player for Marist said, “During games it is nice knowing the ambulances are there, we work with our trainers on stretching before games to avoid any injury, and knowing that they are prepared and ambulances are nearby helps me focus on the game.” Marist athletics preparedness reveals how the college strives to take proper emergency care in all realms of the student spectrum.

Marist security as a whole is a full time operating system. The office of Safety and Security is open 24 hours a day and seven days a week with over 73 full and part time officers working as a unit. All Security Officers are NYS Certified by the Department of State to ensure the utmost care for student’s safety. Whether or not students feel some of the policies enacted by Marist are to strict, it cannot be denied that all of these services offered are strictly meant to ensure the wellbeing of students, the reputation of the campus, and the liability of those working to keep you safe.

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